The biology of molecular chaperones: From molecules, organelles and cells to misfolding diseases

The overall theme of this conference series is protein homeostasis - the regulation of protein folding in the cell - and the mechanisms and consequences of protein misfolding and aggregation caused by cell stress, disease and ageing. This field builds on the parallel efforts of basic biophysicists who study the principles of protein folding and mechanisms of chaperone machines, alongside biochemists and cell biologists who study the actions of chaperone networks and turnover of aggregates in cells and tissues, as well as molecular biologists who study how genetic regulation determines the balance between the stress response, cell proliferation and ageing. The pathologists who deal with major diseases of protein misfolding, such as Alzheimers, Parkinsons and the prion diseases, are increasingly part of this community. These and numerous other serious conditions are associated with deposition of protein aggregates in cells and tissues. The European chaperone meetings have provided a focus for lively discussion and interaction between scientists interested in these different aspects of protein folding, chaperone biology and pathology.
For this series, we have included a new focus on biogenesis and folding of membrane proteins. The interaction of membrane proteins with the chaperone systems is much less well understood and we hope to initiate new discussions in the field by bringing in several leading experts in membrane protein folding and in protein translocation across membranes. In addition, the programme will reflect recent progress in the study of aggregation in vivo by including a greater focus on studies of sub-cellular organelles, the endocytic pathway and autophagy. These topics will be covered in addition to the continuing emphasis on mechanisms of chaperone machines and the stress response, the relationship between protein translation and folding and protein aggregation.
Our objectives are to bring together scientists from research students through to leading established investigators for stimulating talks and ample discussion in a comfortable, isolated location that keeps all participants together and fosters relaxed, informal contacts. Participants’ interests range from single molecule mechanics, through structural and theoretical studies to biochemical and in vivo analyses at the organelle and cell levels, to molecular and cellular pathologists seeking to understand and develop therapies for the intractable, degenerative diseases of protein misfolding.
+ show speakers and program

Anne Bertolotti
MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology
UK
Paula Booth
University of Bristol
UK
Ineke Braakman
Utrecht University
Netherlands
Johannes Buchner
Technical University of Munich
Germany
Bernd Bukau
ZMBH Heidelberg
Germany
Carlos Bustamante
University of California
USA
Tim Clausen
Institute of Molecular Pathology
Austria
Jean-Francois Collet
De Duve Institute, University of Louvain
Belgium
John Collinge
MRC Prion Unit, University College London
UK
Elke Deuerling
University of Konstanz
Germany
Carol Deutch
University of Pennsylvania
USA
Andy Dillin
Salk Institute, San Diego
USA
Arnold Driessen
University of Groningen
Netherlands
Judith Frydman
Stanford University
USA

Carol Gross
University of California
USA
Ulrich Hartl
Institute of Biochemistry, Martinsried
Germany
Linda Hendershot
St.Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis
USA
Arthur Horwich
Yale University
USA
Teru Ogura
Kumamoto University
Japan
Klaus Pfanner
University of Freiburg
Germany
Sheena Radford
University of Leeds
UK
David Ron
University of Cambridge
Cambridge
Sabine Rospert
University of Freiburg
Germany
David Rubinsztein
MRC Laboratory of Molceular Biology
UK
Helen Saibil
Birkbeck, University of London
UK
Joost Schymkowitz
University of Louvain
Belgium
Gunnar Von Heijne
Stockholm University
Sweden
Jonathan Weissman
University of California
USA

17 May - 22 May 2013

Santa Margherita di Pula
Italy
meeting website