Nutrition, Epigenetics and Human Disease

Transient nutritional exposures during critical developmental periods can induce permanent alterations in epigenetic regulation which program metabolic and other biological networks, with lifelong consequences. During other life stages nutrition can dynamically regulate epigenetic processes. There is increasing evidence that gene-nutrient interactions underlie susceptibility to various human diseases, through mechanisms that include interindividual variation in epigenomic profiles. The interaction of nutrition, epigenetics, and human disease is a rapidly evolving area of research with many fundamental outstanding questions and abundant opportunities to translate basic science discoveries to clinical and public health application. A meeting that brings together leaders in human nutrition, human genetics and epigenetics, clinical and animal studies of disease pathogenesis, inborn errors of metabolism, methyl metabolism, stem cell programming, genome stability, transcription, and developmental biology will accelerate and potentially transform research in this field.
+ show speakers and program
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19

16:00—20:00
Arrival and Registration

Promenade

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Chamisa/Ortiz
08:00—09:00
Welcome and Keynote Address
Registered attendees can view abstracts starting on 01/19/2013

Mesa A-B
Ezra S. Susser, Columbia University, USA
The Developmental Origins of Neurodevelopmental Disorders

09:00—11:15
Nutrition and Epigenetics in Development and Disease of the CNS
Registered attendees can view abstracts starting on 01/19/2013

NOTE: Disruption of methyl metabolism resulting from vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies and aging are associated with neurodegenerative disorders ranging from peripheral neuropathies to subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord. This session will focus on the interaction of nutrition and metabolism and epigenetic processes in diseases of the CNS, and its role in neurogenesis and aging.

Mesa A-B
Arthur L. Beaudet, Baylor College of Medicine, USA
The Role of Epigenetics and Carnitine Metabolism in Autism

Peng Jin, Emory University School of Medicine, USA
Epigenetic Mechanisms in Neural Development and Disease

Steven H. Zeisel†, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
Diet-Epigenetic Interactions in Brain Development

Short Talk(s) Chosen from Abstracts

09:40—10:00
Coffee Break

Promenade
11:15—13:00
Poster Setup

Mesa C
13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Mesa C

On Own for Lunch and Recreation

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Promenade
17:00—19:00
Nutrient Regulation of the Epigenetic Machinery
Registered attendees can view abstracts starting on 01/19/2013

NOTE: The establishment and maintenance of chromatin methylation is influenced by the total cellular methylation capacity. This capacity is determined by the expression level of DNA and histone methyltransferases, demethylases and the availability of the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine.` There is increasing evidence that the expression of DNA and histone methyltransferases are responsive to dietary methionine, choline and other nutrients, and modest changes in methyltransferase expression levels have profound impact on chromatin methylation and gene expression. This session will investigate the mechanisms underlying the regulation of methyltransferase expression by nutrients, and its effect on chromatin methylation, gene expression and stem cell programming.

Mesa A-B
Roderick Dashwood, Oregon State University, USA
Mechanisms Underlying Non-Nutritive Bioactive Food Components and Histone Modifications

Paolo Sassone-Corsi, University of California, Irvine, USA
SIRT1: The Link between Energy Balance, Chromatin Remodeling and Circadian Physiology

Andrea Fuso, Sapienza University of Rome
Nutrient Regulation of DNA Methylase and Demethylase Activity

19:15—20:15
Social Hour w/ Lite Bites

Chamisa/Ortiz
19:30—22:00
Poster Session 1

Mesa C

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Chamisa/Ortiz
08:00—11:00
Nutrition and Epigenetics in Obesity
Registered attendees can view abstracts starting on 01/19/2013

NOTE: Epigenetic mechanisms are likely to play an important role in body weight regulation. Animal models and emerging human data indicate that early environmental exposures (e.g. high-calorie diets, maternal obesity, etc.) can influence the development of body weight regulatory mechanisms, and thereby affect risk of obesity throughout life. The role of epigenetics in central and peripheral body weight regulatory mechanisms is attracting extensive attention. This session will cover the latest advances in clinical studies and animal models of ‘nutritional programming’ of obesity, and epigenetic mechanisms in central and peripheral body weight regulation.

Mesa A-B
Richard B. Simerly, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, University of Southern California, USA
Nutritional-Endocrine Interactions in Postnatal Hypothalamic Development

Joseph H. Nadeau, Institute for Systems Biology, USA
Ancestral Paternal Genotype Affects Body Weight and Food Intake Transgenerationally

Short Talk(s) Chosen from Abstracts

Robert A. Waterland, Baylor College of Medicine, USA
Nutritional Influences on Hypothalamic Developmental Epigenetics

Evan D. Rosen, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard University, USA
Epigenomic Analysis of Adipocyte Biology

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Promenade
11:00—13:00
Poster Setup

Mesa C
13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Mesa C

On Own for Lunch and Recreation

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Promenade
17:00—19:00
Nutrient, Methyl Metabolism and Epigenetic Interactions
Registered attendees can view abstracts starting on 01/19/2013

NOTE: S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is the universal methyl donor for chromatin methylation. S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) is the product of methylation reactions, and is a potent inhibitor of both DNA and histone methyltransferases. Therefore, the SAM/SAH ratio has been described as the cellular metabolic methylation potential. The SAM/SAH ratio is regulated over a broad dynamic range, and is sensitive and responsive to multiple nutrients. This session will cover recent advances in our understanding of nutrient regulation of the SAM/SAH ratio in the cell, and its impact on genome methylation, stem cell programming and transcription.

Mesa A-B
David S. Rosenblatt, McGill University, Canada
Discovering New Genes in the One Carbon Pathway Using Exome Sequencing

Patrick J. Stover, Cornell University, USA
Regulation of the Folate Metabolic Network during Mouse Development, and its Impact on Genome Methylation and Stability

Rima Rozen, McGill University, Canada
Impact of Genetic and Nutritional Variation in Folate Metabolism on Cellular Methylation Capacity

19:00—20:00
Social Hour w/ Lite Bites

Chamisa/Ortiz
19:30—22:00
Poster Session 2

Mesa C

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Chamisa/Ortiz
08:00—11:00
Nutrition and Developmental Epigenetics in the Endocrine Pancreas
Registered attendees can view abstracts starting on 01/19/2013

NOTE: The vast majority of type 2 diabetes is associated with obesity, a nutritionally-induced disease. Understanding epigenetic regulation in the endocrine pancreas could open the door to effective approaches to preventing or treating type 2 diabetes. This session will highlight recent mechanistic insights obtained by epigenomic profiling of human endocrine pancreas cell-types, epigenetic hallmarks of endocrine pancreas dysfunction, and epigenetic mechanisms of nutritional programming of impaired glucose homeostasis.

Mesa A-B
Miguel Constancia, University of Cambridge, UK
Maternal Dietary Effects on Epigenetic Regulation of Enhancers in Pancreatic Islets

Frans C. Schuit, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium
Beta-Cell Specific Epigenetic Repression of Disallowed Genes: Implications for Development and Disease

Short Talk(s) Chosen from Abstracts

François Fuks, Free University of Brussels, Belgium
Epigenetic Dysregulation in Pancreatic Islets from Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Jorge Ferrer, Institut d'Investigacions Biomediques Auguts Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Spain
Regulation of the Epigenome in Human Pancreatic Islet Cells

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Promenade
11:00—13:00
Poster Setup

Mesa C
13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Mesa C

On Own for Lunch and Recreation

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Promenade
17:00—19:00
Nutrients and Allelic Targeting of Epigenetic Signatures
Registered attendees can view abstracts starting on 01/19/2013

NOTE: Various nutrient exposures can influence the expression of discrete genes and pathways by altering methylation patterns at specific genetic loci. Nutrients target specific loci for alterations in chromatin methylation and/or demethylation through nuclear receptors, signal transduction pathways and nuclear import processes. This session will focus on the fundamental mechanisms whereby nutrients regulate gene expression by targeted alterations in chromatin methylation, and its role in physiological adaptation maintaining cellular homeostasis.

Mesa A-B
J. Kim Kemper, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Nuclear Receptor and Small Heterodimer Partner Recruitment of Chromatin Remodeling in the Regulation of Lipid and Glucose Metabolism

Chen-Yu Zhang, Nanjing University, China
Regulation of Human Gene Expression by Dietary miRNAs

John A. Stamatoyannopoulos†, University of Washington, USA
Disease Associated Variation in Human Regulatory DNA

19:00—20:00
Social Hour w/ Lite Bites

Chamisa/Ortiz
19:30—22:00
Poster Session 3

Mesa C

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Chamisa/Ortiz
08:00—11:00
Nutritional Modulation of Stem Cell Programming
Registered attendees can view abstracts starting on 01/19/2013

NOTE: Stem cells have the capacity to both self-renew and differentiate into specific cell types. In contrast to the pluripotent stem cells found only in the early embryo, lineage-restricted stem cells such as hematopoietic stem cells and neural stem cells persist into adulthood, and have the ability to differentiate into limited specific cell types. Embryonic and lineage-restricted stem cells offer excellent opportunities to understand fundamental mechanisms underlying nutritional influences on differentiation. Moreover, in cell types that are continuously replaced throughout life (like blood and intestinal epithelium) persistent effects of early nutrition must occur at the stem cell level. This session will focus on developmental epigenetics in embryonic and lineage-restricted stem cells, and nutritional influences on these processes.

Mesa A-B
Sir John B. Gurdon, University of Cambridge, UK
Epigenetics and Nuclear Reprogramming by Eggs and Oocytes

Yi Eve Sun, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
Development Plasticity in Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells - Implications for Development Programming

Short Talk(s) Chosen from Abstracts

Lanlan Shen, Baylor College of Medicine, USA
Nutritional Influences on Stem Cell Developmental Epigenetics in the Colonic Crypt

Speaker to be Announced

09:00—09:20
Coffee Break

Promenade

On Own for Lunch and Recreation

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Promenade
17:00—19:00
Present and Future: Pressing Issues in Environmental Epigenetics
Registered attendees can view abstracts starting on 01/19/2013

Mesa A-B
Jean-Pierre Issa, Temple University School of Medicine, USA
Nutrition, Epigenetics and Cancer

Andrew M. Prentice, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK
Long-Term Consequences of Maternal and Child Nutrition in Developing Countries

Scott F. Gilbert, Swarthmore College, USA
The Global Environment and Ecological Developmental Biology

20:00—21:00
Social Hour w/ Lite Bites

Promenade/Mesa Ballroom
20:00—23:00
Entertainment

Mesa Ballroom

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24


Departure


*Session Chair †Speaker invited, not yet responded.

19 Feb - 24 Feb 2013
Santa Fe
United States of America
meeting website