Metabolic Control of Inflammation and Immunity

Inflammation and immune responses are energetically costly, as are the infections that elicit them. The interplay of these metabolic demands are complex, and frequently �hard-wired� into the responses. An emerging field is illuminating this interplay of metabolism, inflammation, and immunity, and therefore there couldn�t be a better time to have a meeting where scientists who study inflammation and immunity in this context encounter their �metabolic� counterparts from other fields. IL-1b and IL-18 are potent proinflammatory cytokines that are synthesized as pro-forms and matured by the aspartate-specific cysteine protease, IL-1-converting enzyme (ICE or caspase-1). The caspase-1 activation platform, or inflammasome, contains one of a number of �sensor� proteins that respond to a bewildering array of inflammatory insults: including the presence of intracellular pathogens, disruption of membrane integrity, and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Many of these sensors, but not all, are members of the NOD family of intracellular proteins. There are upwards of 30 such proteins encoded in the human genome. This molecular apparatus generates active caspase-1 responsible not only for the proteolytic maturation of IL-1b and IL-18, but also pyroptosis, a pro-inflammatory mode of cell death. While, mutations in the NOD sensors have been associated with relatively rare periodic fever syndromes, there is newfound interest in them with the realization that one member (NOD2) is the most commonly mutated gene in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Further, there has been the recent insight that mutations in other IBD susceptibility genes, such as ATG16L, lead to activation of the inflammasome, possibly due to a deficit in autophagic efficiency and consequent increase in reactive oxygen species that trigger a NOD sensor. Superimposed on this exciting insight has been the understanding that the NOD sensors also respond to metabolic stress, the hallmark of disease states such as Type 2 diabetes. Inflammasome mediated inflammation, likely drives insulin resistance as suggested by a recent clinical trial where neutralizing IL-1b led to a decrease in systemic markers of inflammation and improved glycemic control. Other recently emergent data concerns the interplay of metabolism and the innate and adaptive immune responses. Together, these have dramatically underscored the importance of the inflammation and immunity in metabolic disease states.
+ show speakers and program
MONDAY, JANUARY 21

16:00—20:00
Arrival and Registration

Foyer

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Summit Gallery
08:00—09:00
Welcome and Keynote Address
Registered attendees can view abstracts starting on 12/21/2012

Colorado Ballroom
Richard A. Flavell, Yale University School of Medicine, USA
Microbiota, NLRs and the Inflammasome

09:00—12:00
Metabolism and Signaling
Registered attendees can view abstracts starting on 12/21/2012

Colorado Ballroom
Ronald M. Evans, The Salk Institute, USA
PPAR and Circadian Rhythm

Matthew G. Vander Heiden, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Talk Title to be Determined

Ajay Chawla, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Innate Control of Metabolism

Mitchell A. Lazar, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, USA
PPARs, Diabetes and Inflammation

09:40—10:00
Coffee Break

Foyer
12:00—13:00
Poster Setup

Breckenridge Ballroom
13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Breckenridge Ballroom

On Own for Lunch and Recreation

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Foyer
17:00—19:00
The Inflammasome and Metabolism I
Registered attendees can view abstracts starting on 12/21/2012

Colorado Ballroom
Vishva M. Dixit, Genentech, Inc., USA
New Components: Caspase-11 and Beyond

Jenny P. Ting, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
Fatty Acid-Induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation

Thirumala-Devi Kanneganti, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, USA
Nlrp3 Inflammasome in Diabetes

Eicke Latz, University of Massachusetts Medical School, USA
The Inflammasome in Atherosclerosis

19:00—20:00
Social Hour w/ Lite Bites

Breckenridge Ballroom
19:30—22:00
Poster Session 1

Breckenridge Ballroom

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Summit Gallery
08:00—11:00
The Inflammasome and Metabolism II
Registered attendees can view abstracts starting on 12/21/2012

Colorado Ballroom
Charles A. Dinarello, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, USA
How Does the IL-1 Family Control its Own Members?

Luke A. J. O'Neill, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
Metabolic Control of IL-1b Signaling

Marc Y. Donath, University Hospital Basel, Switzerland
IL-1b and Diabetes

Vishwa Deep Dixit, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, LSU System, USA
The NLRP3 Inflammasome and Obesity-Associated Co-Morbidities

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Foyer
11:00—13:00
Poster Setup

Breckenridge Ballroom
13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Breckenridge Ballroom

On Own for Lunch and Recreation

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Foyer
17:00—19:00
Inflammation and Metabolism
Registered attendees can view abstracts starting on 12/21/2012

Colorado Ballroom
Gökhan S. Hotamisligil, Harvard University, USA
Metabolism, ER Stress and Inflammation

Speaker to be Announced

Steven E. Shoelson, Harvard Medical School, Joslin Diabetes Center, USA
Targeting Inflammation in Insulin Resistance and Diabetes

19:00—20:00
Social Hour w/ Lite Bites

Breckenridge Ballroom
19:30—22:00
Poster Session 2

Breckenridge Ballroom

THURSDAY, JANUARY 24

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Summit Gallery
08:00—11:00
NOD, Microbiota and Metabolism
Registered attendees can view abstracts starting on 12/21/2012

Colorado Ballroom
Maya Saleh, McGill University, Canada
NOD-Mediated Inflammation

Stephen E. Girardin, University of Toronto, Canada
NOD2, Autophagy and Inflammation

Herbert (Skip) W. Virgin IV, Washington University School of Medicine, USA
Autophagy in Inflammation and Disease

Gabriel Nuñez, University of Michigan, USA
Inflammasome Influence on Microbiota

09:20—09:40
Coffee Break

Foyer
11:00—13:00
Poster Setup

Breckenridge Ballroom
13:00—22:00
Poster Viewing

Breckenridge Ballroom

On Own for Lunch and Recreation

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Foyer
17:00—19:00
Mitochondria, Inflammation and Metabolism
Registered attendees can view abstracts starting on 12/21/2012

Colorado Ballroom
Kate A. Fitzgerald, University of Massachusetts Medical School, USA
Cytosolic Immune Surveillance

Speaker to be Announced

Richard M. Siegel, NIAMS, National Institutes of Health, USA
Mitochondrial ROS: Fuel for the Fire of Autoinflammation

19:00—20:00
Social Hour w/ Lite Bites

Breckenridge Ballroom
19:30—22:00
Poster Session 3

Breckenridge Ballroom

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25

07:00—08:00
Breakfast

Summit Gallery
08:00—11:00
Metabolic Control of Adaptive Immunity
Registered attendees can view abstracts starting on 12/21/2012

Colorado Ballroom
Drew M. Pardoll, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, USA
HIF1 in the Treg/Th17 Axis

Jonathan D. Powell, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, USA
mTOR Regulation of T Cell Function

Douglas R. Green, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, USA
Metabolic Reprogramming in Activated T Cells

Jeffrey C. Rathmell, Duke University, USA
Glucose Metabolism in T Cell Activation and CD4 Subsets

09:00—09:20
Coffee Break

Foyer

On Own for Lunch and Recreation

16:30—17:00
Coffee Available

Foyer
17:00—19:00
Cell Death, Immunity and Metabolism
Registered attendees can view abstracts starting on 12/21/2012

Colorado Ballroom
Michael Karin, University of California, San Diego, USA
NF-kappaB, Inflammation and Metabolism

Kodi S. Ravichandran, University of Virginia, USA
Apoptotic Cell Clearance and the Phagocyte Metabolism

Nika N. Danial, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, USA
A Role for Bcl2 Family Members in Diabetes

19:00—20:00
Social Hour w/ Lite Bites

Breckenridge Ballroom
20:00—23:00
Entertainment

Breckenridge Ballroom

SATURDAY, JANUARY 26


Departure


*Session Chair †Speaker invited, not yet responded.

21 Jan - 26 Jan 2013
Breckenridge
United States of America
meeting website