Post-GWAS Horizons in Molecular Epidemiology: Digging Deeper into the Environment

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have brought forth a vast amount of information on genetic risk factors for cancer. As we transition to a “post-GWAS era” the importance of state-of-the-art measurement of non-genetic (i.e., environmental) risk factors of disease and gene-environment interactions is expected to increase. The conference will showcase and discuss new areas of research in molecular epidemiology, focusing on the integration of novel measures of internal and external environmental factors in consortia and genetic studies. Research findings will be presented to illustrate the vast potential within the context of epidemiologic studies in a post-GWAS context to further the prevention of cancer and elucidate mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Large-scale publicly-available research resources will be highlighted and their “rules to play” discussed. Late-breaking findings from genomics, epigenomics, and proteomics in epidemiologic studies will be presented with a view to discern the most promising strategies with the greatest public health impact. The proposed conference will bring together researchers from different disciplines, who have excelled in their research areas and are creative in developing new methods. Building on our previous, successful MEG conferences, we expect that the conference will provide for highly stimulating discussions that will help propel the field of molecular epidemiology forward.
+ show speakers and program
Educational Session 1: Digging Deeper: New Approaches to Assaying Biospecimens in Epidemiology
1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m.
New assays, old specimens: Multiplexing for plasma and urine
Patrick M. Sluss, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
New specimens: Buccal cells, nasal swabs, fecal samples
David G. Cox, Cancer Research Center of Lyon, INSERM U1052, Lyon, France
New assays, old specimens: Telomere length and activity
Jennifer A. Doherty, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH
Short talks from proffered abstracts
Break
3:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m.
Educational Session 2: Computational Horizons in High-Dimensional Data
3:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m.
Searching for GxE interactions in genome-wide association studies
David V. Conti, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
Identification of tumor-associated cassette exons in human cancer through exon-array and RNA-Seq data analysis
Graziano Pesole, CNR-IBBE, University of Bari, Bari, Italy
Additional speaker to be announced
Free Time / Dinner on Own
5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.
Keynote Session: Two Sides of the Same Coin: Genes and Exposures
7:30 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
The phenome and pleiotropy: Dissecting the architecture of complex traits
Marylyn D. Ritchie, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
Characterizing the exposome
Martyn T. Smith, University of California, Berkeley, CA
The state of GWAS: What have we learned and where can we go?
Stephen J. Chanock, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
Opening Reception
9:00 p.m.-10:30 p.m.

Monday, November 12
Continental Breakfast
7:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m.
Session 1: Novel Post-GWAS Tools and Molecular Technologies
8:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.
Title to be announced
David J. Hunter, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
Towards epigenetic epidemiology of cancer
Jean-Pierre J. Issa, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
microRNAs: From cancer susceptibility, detection, to progression
Hua Zhao, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY
Short talks from proffered abstracts
Break
10:00 a.m.-10:30 a.m.
Session 2: Challenges in Post-GWAS Studies
10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Tumor heterogeneity: Making the most of diversity
Fergus J. Couch, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN
Deciphering the signals from the GWAS hits: From function to epidemiology and back again
Simon A. Gayther, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
Extracting predictive networks from high-dimensional data
John Quackenbush, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
Free Time / Lunch on Own
12:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
Session 3: The Exposome: Using Technology to Define Exposures
2:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m.
Technology to assess physical activity and sedentary behavior
Patty Freedson, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA
Chemicals in the environment: BPA and other worries
Gail S. Prins, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL
Adipose tissue as a rich information source
Karen E. Foster-Schubert, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
Short talks from proffered abstracts
Poster Session A / Reception
4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m.
Evening Off / Dinner on Own
6:30 p.m.-

Tuesday, November 13
Continental Breakfast
7:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m.
Session 4: It’s a Small World: Microbiome, Viruses, and Bacteria
8:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.
The microbiome and its association with human metabolism and adiposity
Meredith A. Hullar, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA
Susceptibility to neoplasia following HPV infection
Mark W. Schiffman, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD
The bacterial world and the genome
Nina R. Salama, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA
Short talks from proffered abstracts
Break
10:00 a.m.-10:30 a.m.
Session 5: Resources for Molecular Epidemiology: Potential and Successes
10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Title to be announced
Joseph G. Vockley, Inova Translational Medicine Institute, Falls Church, VA
The Post-GWAS Consortium (U19): Assessing the functional relevance of gene variation
Alvaro Monteiro, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL
The NCI cohort consortium: Increasing power, enhancing collaborations, advancing science
Deborah Winn, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
Identifying breast cancer metastasis susceptibility genes using mouse models
Kent W. Hunter, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
Free Time / Lunch on Own
12:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
Panel Discussion: Gene-Environment: Where Do We Go from Here?
2:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m.
Poster Session B / Reception
4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m.
Evening Off / Dinner on Own
6:30 p.m.-

Wednesday, November 14
Continental Breakfast
7:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m.
Professional Advancement Session: Meet-the-Speaker Roundtables
8:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m.
Break
9:00 a.m.-9:15 a.m.
Session 6: The ‘Omics of Exposure
9:15 a.m.-11:15 a.m.
From the genome to the metabolome: The promises and limits of metabolomics
Hannelore Daniel, University of Munich, Munich, Germany
Using metabolomics in epidemiologic studies: An example for pancreatic cancer
Brian M. Wolpin, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
Biomarkers of diet predict disease risk
Bruce S. Kristal, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA

11 Nov - 14 Nov 2012

Hollywood
United States of America
meeting website