American Society for Microbiology meeting 2012

American Society for Microbiology meeting 2012
+ show speakers and program
General Microbiology Program

Saturday, June 16

Symposia

Special Interest Sessions
Microbiology Career Choices: Learn What's Available and How to Succeed
1:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Developed by the Education Board


Convener:
NEIL BAKER; The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

Invited Speakers:
Microbiologists representing the diversity of careers from entry through top level positions in industry, government, higher education, public policy and more.

Description:
Take control of your future! Identify a career that suits your personality, interest, and needs. In this special interest session, participants will first hear from a short list of microbiologists from diverse careers in microbiology. Following these short presentations, the audience will interact with career advisers in small group discussions. Potential career advisers may come from and describe the work, culture, and people

In a clinical laboratory
As a public health worker in the field
In sales, marketing or business development inside a company
On a research team in a big pharma or agri business
In a high security, defense agency
As a teacher of high school or community college students
On the frontlines reporting science news
In the halls of government affecting science policy

Participants will be given the opportunity to chat with several career advisers over the afternoon session using the popular “speed-dating” format. This session is targeted to all students, post-docs, and scientists-in-training as well as faculty members advising students about microbiology careers.



OPENING SESSION

Opening Session
5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Conveners:
MARGARET MCFALL-NGAI; University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
ARTURO CASADEVALL; Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY
DAVID C. HOOPER; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA

Invited Speakers:

Biology by Design: The Emergence of Synthetic Biology
JAMES COLLINS; Center for BioDynamics, Boston, MA ASM Lecturer

Inherited Wolbachia Infections of Insects and a Potential Role in Reducing the Transmission of Dengue
SCOTT O’NEILL; Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Iron Oxides to Infections: Linking Geo- and Medical Microbiology
DIANNE NEWMAN; California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA



Sunday, June 17

PLENARY SESSIONS

Avoidance and Subversion of Host Cell Defenses by Intracellular Pathogens
8:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Conveners:
WILLIAM JACKSON; Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI
JENNIFER PHILIPS; NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY

Invited Speakers:
WILLIAM JACKSON; Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI
JENNIFER PHILIPS; NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY
GEOFFREY SMITH; University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK, GlaxoSmithKline International Member of the Year Award
CHRISTIAN MUNZ; University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
KIM ORTH; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX

Description:
To survive, intracellular pathogens must deal with a stunning variety of host cell defenses. Viruses and bacteria have evolved strategies to manipulate the host cell and avoid or subvert sophisticated defense mechanisms. Many viruses and bacteria usurp the host cell’s vesicle sorting machinery to promote generation and regulate maturation of replication vacuoles. The autophagy pathway, critical for bulk degradation of cellular contents, can destroy cytosolic viruses and bacteria and promote presentation of pathogen-derived peptides on MHC Class II molecules. However, several pathogens subvert and exploit this pathway for intracellular replication. Certain viruses have evolved strategies to block cellular immune signal transduction pathways such as activation of the NF-кB transcription factor. In some cases evolutionarily divergent pathogens have adapted similar strategies to alter the biology of the host cell. This session will illustrate how viruses and bacteria alter host cell membrane traffic as well as signaling pathways that coordinate broader immune responses.



Microbiology in 2022: The Single-cell Point of View
8:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.


Developed by the Junior Advisory Group

Conveners:
TIM MIYASHIRO; University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison,WI
FILIPA GODOY-VITORINO; DOE-Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, CA

Invited Speakers:
IDO GOLDING; Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
THIERRY EMONET; Yale University, New Haven, CT
VICTORIA ORPHAN; California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA
NED S. WINGREEN; Princeton University, Princeton, NJ
RAMUNAS STEPANAUSKAS; Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, West Boothbay Harbour, ME

Description:
Recent technological advances have revolutionized our ability to examine microbes at their most fundamental unit: the single cell. Striking developments in fluorescence microscopy, microfluidics, next-generation sequencing, and mathematical modeling now let us explore the essential mechanisms driving diversity, activity, and interactions among individual cells within populations and communities. Our newly-founded Junior Advisory Group for the ASM General Meeting has designed its inaugural plenary session to highlight the research of interdisciplinary scientists using these exciting new approaches. Their work explores the marvelous microbial adaptations that allow individual cells to respond to the world they encounter; approaches that will help define the direction of research in microbiology over the next decade.



Sculpting the Bacterial Cell
8:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Convener:
WILLIAM MARGOLIN; University of Texas Medical School-Houston, Houston, TX

Invited Speakers:
WILLIAM MARGOLIN; University of Texas-Houston, Houston, TX, Division J Lecturer
LUCY SHAPIRO; Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA
RUT CARBALLIDO-LOPEZ; Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Jouy-en-Josas, France
KEVIN D. YOUNG; University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR
JOE POGLIANO; University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA

Description:
Bacteria display a strikingly diverse set of morphologies, and the relative simplicity of bacterial cells makes them ideal models for understanding how physics and genes combine to assemble, organize, grow, and divide a cell. Our understanding of how a whole cell is organized is still "taking shape", but recent advances in imaging protein dynamics within live cells and numerous structural and biophysical approaches have spurred significant progress, as have comparisons among different species. This session will explore how cytoskeletal proteins act along with other proteins and mechanical constraints to help a variety of bacterial species organize their cellular contents, grow, and divide while maintaining characteristic morphologies. The speakers in this session are among the leaders in the field of bacterial cell biology, and will share their latest insights. The session should be attractive to a wide general audience.



Who's Doing What in Microbial Communities
8:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Convener:
MARY LIDSTROM; University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Invited Speakers:
MARY LIDSTROM; University of Washington, Seattle, WA
JILLIAN BANFIELD; University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
JONATHAN ZEHR; University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, Division Q Lecturer
ANN PEARSON; Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
STEPHEN GIOVANNONI; Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USFCC/J. Roger Porter Award

Description:
Culture-independent molecular biological techniques, such as those based on 16S Rrna sequences or on metagenomics, have revolutionized our ability to answer the question of "Who is There" in microbial communities, and provides some information on the potential for various functions in microbial populations. Activity measurements can provide information on bulk processes occurring in a microbial community. However, these techniques do not tell you which organisms are active and to what their contribution is the build activity. Several novel techniques are being developed to answer the question "Who's Doing What" in microbial communities. the speakers in this session will give examples of the application of these techniques to investigate microbial activity in diverse systems, including measuring physiological activity in single cells, using transcriptomics and proteomics to assess gene expression, and the use of lipids as biomarkers for organisms and activities in past and present communities. These and other techniques are allowing us to answer the crucial question "Who's Doing What" in microbial communities.



Special Interest Session
Striking the Balance in Fresh Produce: Food Safety, Animal Control, Water Sourcing and Environmental Impact - Research Issues in Microbiology
11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Developed by the Committee on Agricultural and Food Microbiology

Conveners:
MICHAEL DOYLE; University of Georgia, Athens, GA
JACQUELINE FLETCHER;Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK

Invited Speakers:
JACQUELINE FLETCHER;Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK
DAVID WILLIAM KENNEDY ACHESON; Leavitt Partners, St. Lake City, UT
CYNTHIA E. ROSENZWEIG; National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC
MICHAEL BEACH; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA

Description:
This session, sponsored by the PSAB Committee on Agricultural and Food Microbiology, will discuss complex issues that focus on fresh produce but that often arise during microbial research dealing with the need to balance multiple interests related to food safety, water sourcing, animal control and environmental impact. Parallels can be drawn across the research spectrum and this session will be of broad interest to ASM members and general meeting attendees.



Special Interest Session
Careers for Microbiologists
11:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Developed by the Career Development Committee/Membership Board

Convener:
JOANNA B. GOLDBERG;University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Invited Speakers:
PRESTON GARCIA;Castleton State College, Castleton, VT
ELEANOR M. JENNINGS;URS Corporation, Gaithersburg, MD
SONIA K. GUTERMAN;Lawson and Weitzen, LLP, Boston, MA

Description:
This session will provide specific examples of accomplished microbiologists, who have followed disparate paths and found success in diverse careers. In addition to formal presentations by these speakers, time will be devoted to meeting and personally interacting with them. The goal is to provide information on some of the typical and less typical career opportunities in microbiology.



Special Interest Session
The Culture of Rice: From Farm to Fermentation
11:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Developed by the Center for the History of Microbiology/ASM Archives

Conveners:
KAREN-BETH G. SCHOLTHOF; Texas A&M University, College Station, TX

Invited Speakers:
KAREN-BETH G. SCHOLTHOF; Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
JOAN W. BENNETT; Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ
IZUMI MOTAI; Takara Sake, Berkeley, CA
FRANCIS X. CUNNINGHAM, JR; University of Maryland, College Park, MD
PAMELA C. RONALD; University of California-Davis, Davis, CA

Description:

This symposium, sponsored by the Center for the History of Microbiology/ASM Archives, will focus on the history of microbiology using rice as the "driver" and will cover global issues in agriculture, nutrition, microbiology and fermentation. Using the Pacific-Rim as a starting point, the symposium will elaborate on the expansive use and culture of rice, the primary source of calories and nutrition for almost half the world population. The historical and cultural significance of rice and its uses, from basic food to fermented products including sake, will be examined. The importance of rice in understanding host innate immunity, nutritionally beneficial genetic engineering, and the development and use of fermented foodstuffs and pharmaceuticals will be discussed. This symposium will provide a broadly ranging discourse that should be of interest to ASM members associated with education, outreach or research in the areas of food microbiology, biotechnology, host-pathogen interactions, fermentation, and the history of microbiology.



Special Interest Session
New Title
Microbiome: Racial and Ethnic Differences
11:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Developed by the Committee on Microbiological Issues Impacting Minorities

Conveners:
MARIAN JOHNSON-THOMPSON
FLOYD L. WORMLEY, JR.; The University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX

Invited Speakers:
LARRY J. FORNEY; University of Idaho, Moscow, ID
J. DENNIS FORTENBERRY; Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis, IN
COURTNEY J. ROBINSON, Ph. D, Howard University, Washington DC
LIGIA PERALTA; University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
RICHARD SHARP; Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH

Description:
The human microbiota has a significant influence upon human physiology, immune responses, and nutrition. Consequently, multiple efforts, including the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, are underway to develop resources that enable the characterization of the human microbiota and analysis of its role in human health and disease. A goal of this initiative is to understand whether changes in the human microbiome can be linked to changes in human health. Recent studies that identified inherent differences in microbial communities between individuals of different racial and ethnic groups support the need for considering differences within the microbiota between individuals when performing risk assessments and disease diagnosis. This session will examine the importance and benefits of ensuring broad racial and ethnic diversity among study participants as well as the ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI) of these studies.



Special Interest Session
In the Year 2525: Survival Strategies and Clinical Microbiology's Leadership Role in Tomorrow's Healthcare Teams
11:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Developed by the Public and Scientific Affairs Board

Conveners:
DONNA WOLK; University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
VICKIE BASELSKI; University of Tennessee, Memphis, TN

Invited Speakers:
VICKIE BASELSKI; University of Tennessee, Memphis, TN
KIMBERLE C. CHAPIN-ROBERTSON; University/Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI
ELIZABETH M. MARLOWE;Southern California Permanente Medical Group, North Hollywood, California
AMY LEBER; Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH
DONNA WOLK; University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

Description:
Effective processes for laboratory growth, new test implementation, evidence-based practices, and workforce development, are often misunderstood by the healthcare community and their collaborators. As biosciences and medical diagnostics become increasingly important to the larger scientific community, the life sciences industry, government funding sources, legislators, and policy makers, it is critical for all microbiologists to understand the principles of laboratory medicine and the impact of clinical microbiologists on a modern healthcare systems. This session will highlight the professional value of clinical microbiology practices that support patient care and prudent use of healthcare resources.



Divide and Conquer! The Evolution of Diverse Microbial Division Mechanisms
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
ESTHER ANGERT; Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Invited Speakers:
JOHN FUERST; University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
ESTHER ANGERT; Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Description:
Cell propagation is a fundamental process for all cellular life. While FtsZ-mediated binary fission dominates bacterial and euryarchaeotal division modes, alternative mechanisms have evolved in several major microbial lineages. This session with explore recent advances in the field of microbial cell division. It will feature model systems that either do not use binary fission or do not divide using FtsZ. By featuring these diverse systems, we will explore factors that influence the evolution of cell propagation mechanisms.



Getting Down to the Nuts and Bolts of Pathogenesis
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
KARLA SATCHELL; Northwestern University, Chicago, IL
MATTHIAS MACHNER; National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

Invited Speakers:
MATTHIAS MACHNER; National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
KARLA SATCHELL; Northwestern University, Chicago,IL
GUILLAUME DUMÉNIL; INSERM, Paris, France

Description:
Bacterial pathogenesis is essentially the sum of numerous distinct biochemical and cell biological interactions which eventually result in alteration of the environment that is beneficial for either the host or the bacterium. This session will consider how specific biochemical changes to bacterial structures, bacteria-mediated alterations to host proteins, and interactions between bacterial and host proteins can enhance or antagonize pathogenesis. The speakers will discuss the structural mechanisms of action of the virulence factors and how this detailed biochemical knowledge enhances our understanding of overall pathogenesis. Speakers will emphasize alterations to specific bacterial or host proteins and how these detailed changes integrate into the broader scope of the infectious process.



The Great Indoors: Recent Advances in the Ecology of Built Environments
3:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
BRENDAN BOHANNAN; University of Oregon, Eugene, OR

Invited Speakers:
BRENDAN BOHANNAN; University of Oregon, Eugene, OR
MARK HERNANDEZ; University of Colorado, Boulder, CO
JORDAN PECCIA; Yale University, New Haven, CT

Description:
Although humans in industrialized countries spend nearly 90% of their time in enclosed buildings, we know very little about the biology of the indoor environment. However, this is starting to change. Over the past few years, the field of indoor ecology has grown dramatically. Ecologists are beginning to apply ecological theory and concepts to understanding buildings as ecosystems. A new understanding of the biodiversity of built environments is emerging, as well as a new appreciation of the importance of interactions between humans and non-human life indoors. The proposed symposium will showcase this emerging understanding. We will feature presentations that demonstrate the utility of ecological theory for understanding built environments, that describe the dynamics of biodiversity indoors and that illustrate the interactions of humans with indoor ecology. Our focus will be on the ecology of the dominant forms of non-human life indoors - microorganisms - and their interactions with humans.



Special Interest Session
The Highway to Success for Women in Microbiology: Avoiding the Potholes and Roadblocks
3:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Developed by the Committee on the Status of Women in Microbiology

Conveners:
LORRAINE A. FINDLAY; Nassau Community College, Garden City, NY
HAZEL BARTON; The University of Akron, Akron, OH

Invited Speakers:
JOAN HERBERS; President, Association for Women in Science, Alexandria, VA
JOAN STEITZ; Yale University, New Haven, CT
MARY ANN MASON; Berkeley Law Center for Health, Economics, and Family Security, Berkeley, CA
ERICKA GRAY; DisputEd, Boston, MA
SHIRLEY M. MALCOM; American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC

Description:
This session, sponsored by the Committee on the Status of Women in Microbiology, will provide strategies to assist women to remain and advance in careers in microbiology. Women in large numbers still continue to leave careers in microbiology and the sciences in general, and women continue to encounter glass ceilings and be under-rewarded in professional environments. Topics will include: When and why women are lost from science careers; How to balance the building of a career while raising a family - what are the inherent problems and what is the best timing; How to prepare for promotion and advancement; How to negotiate for a salary - women can have different negotiation styles; How to resolve gender discrimination and harassment issues; How to gain assertiveness, assure proper acknowledgement, and resolve conflicts. All members of ASM can gain useful information from this session.



Ion Homeostasis in Bacteria
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
IAN R. BOOTH; University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom
SAMANTHA MILLER; University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom

Invited Speakers:
IAN R. BOOTH; University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom
MING ZHOU; Columbia University, New York, NY
JAMES NAISMITH; University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, United Kingdom

Description:
The growth and survival of bacteria is conditional on the regulated flux of major cations and anions. We are familiar with the regulatory circuits that determine the intracellular levels of potentially toxic metals, such as zinc and copper ions, but we are often neglectful in developing our understanding of the most basic ions, potassium, sodium, protons and chloride. In this session we will present three major aspects of ionic regulatory mechanisms, including uptake and efflux of ions, but we will also place this understanding of mechanism in the wider context of cell physiology. We hope to have additional short presentations regarding novel phenomena, opportunities for therapeutic interventions that act via transport mechanisms, and other wider aspects of ion homeostasis. Opportunities will be created to ask questions regarding the basic properties of the cell in respect to ion homeostasis. By the end of the session we expect that participants will have a deeper understanding of ion transport, a seemingly abstruse but fundamental topic to cell physiology.



Mechano-Microbiology: How Bacteria Sense and Respond to Physical Forces
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
ZEMER GITAI; Princeton University, Princeton, NJ

Invited Speakers:
DOUGLAS WEIBEL; University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
WENDY THOMAS; University of Washington, Seattle, WA
DANIEL BOND; University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN

Description:
While bacteria have long been known to sense and respond to chemical signals from their environments, recent work indicates that they can also sense and respond to physical signals. Such signals include physical confinement, shear stresses, association with solid surfaces, and even electrical stimuli. In addition to exploring how different types of physical forces affect bacteria, we will also consider the vast range of size scales affected by physical stimuli, including intracellular organization, cell-cell associations, and community-wide organization in biofilms. Finally, we may touch on how bacteria can not only sense their existing physical environment, but can also actively manipulate that same environment. The area of mechano-microbiology is highly inter-disciplinary and in this session we hope to bring together microbiologists, biophysicists, cell biologists, and engineers to discuss this exciting emerging field.



Microbial Colonization and the Host: Do the Colonists Reshape the Landscape?
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
LAURA J. KNOLL; University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI

Invited Speakers:
LAURA J. KNOLL; University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
JO HANDELSMAN; Yale University, New Haven, CT
THOMAS B. NUTMAN; National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

Description:
This session will examine the diverse mechanism whereby microbial colonization benefits the host. Colonization has traditionally been defined as a microbial community that does not affect the host. Emerging evidence now shows that microbial communities play several different beneficial roles including resisting infection from pathogenic microbes and modulating the immune response. Presentations will focus on the co-evolution of microbes with each other and the host. We will also examine the consequences to the host when colonizing microbes removed. Data from bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasite infections in their respective insect, mouse and human hosts will be presented. Examples will include how microbes that are usually considered pathogens can play protective roles against subsequent lethal challenges or during inflammatory diseases. This session will challenge canonical thinking about chronic infections and host/microbe interactions.



New Data Shed New Light on Old Questions
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
LAURA L. MAYS HOOPES; Pomona College, Claremont, CA

Invited Speakers:
JAMES L. VAN ETTEN; University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE
LILLIAM CASILLAS-MARTINEZ; University of Puerto Rico, Humacao, Puerto Rico, Division W Lecturer and Carski Foundation Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching Award
LAURA L. MAYS HOOPES; Pomona College, Claremont, CA

Description:
The symposium will introduce many of the new paradigms in microbiology, presenting new findings in a way that is digestible and applicable to teaching. Our featured topics will be how the discovery of mimiviruses challenges viral evolutionary theories and changes the definition of “life,” how microbial ecology is transformed by new studies of “superorganisms” and metagenomes and geological aggregates of microbes as opposed to individuals, and how understanding epigenetics and other non-DNA based regulatory systems, which can be poorly understood by educators, interconnect many regulatory systems.



New Insights into Fungal Pathogenesis
3:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
KIRSTEN NIELSEN; University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
ROBERT CRAMER; Montana State University, Bozeman, MT

Invited Speakers:
KIRSTEN NIELSEN; University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
ROBERT CRAMER; Montana State University, Bozeman, MT
JIM KRONSTAD; The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, Division F Lecturer

Description:
The incidence of life threatening fungal infections continues to increase due to expansion of immunocompromised patient populations. In this session, we will explore recent developments in our understanding of how these human pathogenic fungi are able to cause disease and how this increased understanding may be utilized therapeutically to improve patient outcomes. Recent research developments that will be discussed during this session include mechanisms of fungal adaptation to host microenvironments that allow robust in vivo fungal growth, host induced changes in fungal morphology that alter host fungal recognition and effector cell mediated killing, and fungal mediated host evasion strategies that encompass both microenvironmental and immune induced mechanisms. Taken together, these seminars will present an excellent overview of our current understanding of fungal pathogenesis mechanisms that is applicable to a broad spectrum of fungal-host interactions and provide a foundation for discussion on how these mechanisms can be used to develop new therapeutic options for these often lethal infections.



Recent Advances in RNA Polymerase Structure/Function and Transcriptional Regulation
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
ROBERT LANDICK; University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI

Invited Speakers:
ROBERT LANDICK; University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
WILMA ROSS; University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
SETH DARST; Rockefeller University, New York, NY

Description:
The past several years have witnessed continued advances in our understanding of RNA polymerase structure and how changes in structure are coupled to regulatory decisions. These include insights into conformational changes that underpin regulation of both the initiation of transcription and the elongation of RNA transcripts. It is now possible to connect these structural insights to regulatory mechanisms in ways that not only define the details of the particular system under study, but also generate principles that can be applied to other regulatory systems by inference. This session will provide attendees up-to-date knowledge of these recent advances that can be applied to countless problems in microbiology.



Symbiosis as a Driver of Ecology and Evolution
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
EDWARD G. RUBY; University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
NICOLE DUBILIER; Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany

Invited Speakers:
CAMERON CURRIE; University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, Division R Lecturer
UTE HENTSCHEL HUMEIDA; University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
ANGELA MARIA MARCOBAL BARRANCO; Stanford University, Stanford, CA

Description:
Biology is experiencing a revolution in its vision of how animals and plants live in the world. We now know such organisms do not exist as individuals, but function together with consortia of microorganisms, many of which define where and how the organism lives. These mutualistic associations can be ancient, and the co-evolution of an animal host with one or more specific symbionts will often affect the present-day behavior, morphology and metabolism of both partners. As a result, the host species can now live in a new environment, on novel nutrients, and the symbiont will have adapted to the specific ecology of its host. This session will explore the evolutionary and ecological consequences of symbiosis in both invertebrate and vertebrate hosts, as well as the adaptations that have occurred in their specific microbial partners that increase the symbiont's evolutionary trajectory and ecological competitiveness. Thus, studies of the microbiota of marine sponges, social insects and humans are joining to reveal the principles underlying the development and function of symbioses in general.



What's for Dinner? Connecting Bacterial Metabolism with Host Interaction
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
ANDREAS BAUMLER; University of California at Davis School of Medicine, Davis, CA

Invited Speakers:
VICTOR J. DIRITA; University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, Division B Lecturer
SEBASTIAN E. WINTER; University of California at Davis School of Medicine, Davis, CA
NICOLE KOROPATKIN; University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI

Description:
Microbial metabolism in the host underlies both beneficial and pathogenic interactions. The host response can dramatically alter growth conditions, which impacts pathogens but also alters the microbial community structure in some niches, such as the intestinal tract. This session will focus on emerging mechanistic studies elucidating how metabolism impacts colonization of specific niches in the host.



When Good Bugs Go Bad: Microbiome Dynamics and Disease
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
FOREST ROHWER; San Diego State University, San Diego, CA
LITA M. PROCTOR; National Human Genome Research Inst/NIH, Bethesda, MD

Invited Speakers:
FOREST ROHWER; San Diego State University, San Diego, CA
THOMAS C. G. BOSCH; Christian-Albrechts-University-Kiel, Kiel, Germany
KAREN GUILLEMIN; University of Oregon, Eugene, OR

Description:
The human microbiome consists of thousands of viral and microbial species which inhabit the human body and have co-evolved with us to protect against pathogens, regulate organ development and supply nutrients and essential co-factors for health. The members of the microbiome, which include viruses, phage, bacteria, archaea and eukaryotic microbes, interact to maintain this ecosystem but sometimes microbiomes can go awry and imbalances in microbiome function can lead to disease. This symposium will explore the various roles that the microbiome and its specific members play in the initiation and persistence of diseases. Emergent properties of the microbiome ecosystem will be compared and contrasted across various diseases. This session will also address the roles of the microbiome in disease as an evolutionary continuum from mutualism to pathogenesis.



Monday, June 18

PLENARY SESSIONS

Biogeochemical Cycling: Past, Present and Future
8:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Conveners:
ALEXANDRA Z. WORDEN; Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA
STEPHEN GIOVANNONI; Oregon State University, Corvalis, OR

Invited Speakers:
DAVID T. JOHNSTON; Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
BESS WARD; Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, Procter & Gamble Award in Applied Environmental Microbiology Award
KAREN CASCIOTTI; Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA
MARY ANN MORAN; University of Georgia, Athens, GA
E. VIRGINIA ARMBRUST; University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Description:
The Earth’s climate and biogeochemical cycles are entering a period of accelerated change as the result of human activities. Microbial evolution has been driven by energy from light and biogeochemical transformations, and in turn, microorganisms have shaped the evolution of biogeochemical cycles. This symposium addresses new knowledge about modern microbial ecosystems and the impact that information is having on our understanding of geochemical history. Technological advances, including next generation sequencing and the improved scope and resolution of isotopic analyses are yielding insights into the evolution of microbial metabolism and the complex arrangements of metabolic processes into networks of community interaction. These advancements are also facilitating reconstruction of ancient patterns of change in geochemical cycles from the geological record as well as discoveries on present day activities of individual taxa. How does this new information impact our understanding of past, present and possible future scenarios of geochemical change? This session will explore fundamental elemental cycles such as the sulfur, nitrogen and carbon cycles and address new insights on the evolution and ecology of key taxa. At a broader level, we will discuss how these cycles, and the complex microbial interactions that mediate them, operate in modern times as well as perspectives on past and future times.



Interrogating the Genome
8:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Convener:
CAROL GROSS; University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA

Invited Speakers:
ALEXANDER D. JOHNSON; University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
RACHEL BREM; University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
HANA EL-SAMAD; University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
CHRISTOPHER LEE; University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
CAROL A. GROSS; University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA

Description:
The proliferation of sequence data provides an enormous opportunity to enhance our understanding of biological systems. Functional genomics utilizes sequence information to accelerate our understanding of gene function and pathway construction using a variety of technologies. The speakers in this session are at the forefront of these emerging approaches, including evolutionary genomics, genome-scale phenotyping and examining decision making at the cellular scale. Participants will not only be exposed to new fields, but are likely to get new ideas for their own research.



Microbes Trigger and Shape Immunity
8:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Convener:
SARKIS MAZMANIAN; California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA

Invited Speakers:
AKIKO IWASAKI; Yale University, New Haven, CT, Eli Lilly and Company Research Award
SARKIS MAZMANIAN; California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA
SAMUEL MILLER; University of Washington, Seattle, WA
CHARLES BEVINS; University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
JEFF WEISER; University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, Division D Lecturer

Description:
Mucosal surfaces are colonized by microbes that both promote and interact with the immune system. This session will focus on mucosal interactions and how microbes promote and alter the development of the immune system. Bacteria occupy nearly every niche in ecology. Animals are no exception: almost every environmentally exposed surface of the body is colonized with bacteria. Although adversely affected by bacterial infections (whose occurrence is relatively rare given the ubiquity of bacterial colonization), mammals have developed an essential requirement for association with bacteria. Adaptive co-evolution has guided this dynamic molecular conversation for millennia. However, the mechanism(s) employed by pathogenic and symbiotic bacteria to network with the immune system are only now being revealed. This symposium will bring together leading experts in the growing field of understanding how microbes shape their immune environment during both infections and symbiosis.



One Health: Humans, Animals and the Environment
8:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Conveners:
STANLEY MALOY; San Diego State University, San Diego, CA
RONALD ATLAS; University of Louisville, Louisville, KY

Invited Speakers:
IAN LIPKIN; Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY
NIKOS GURFIELD; County of San Diego, San Diego, CA
MYRON M. LEVINE; University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, Maurice Hilleman/Merck Award

Description:
The health of humans, animals, and the environment are inextricably interconnected. Disruption of the environment often creates new niches for the evolution of infectious diseases, and provides opportunities for the transmission of pathogens to animals or humans. The majority of infectious diseases that affect humans are acquired from animals. The ease and speed of travel makes it possible for a new human disease acquired from the environment or animals in one part of the world to rapidly spread to the rest of the world. Animals also often acquire infectious diseases from humans. Thus, human health depends upon health of animals and the environment. However, the fields of human and veterinary medicine and environmental sciences often fail to recognize this linkage. The panel will address these issues and discuss the impact of the One Health concept on the future of human and veterinary medicine and environmental policy.



Unseen Forces: Microbes Shape Animal Biology
8:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Conveners:
MICHAEL HADFIELD; University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI
MARGARET MCFALL-NGAI; University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI

Invited Speakers:
MICHAEL HADFIELD; University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI
NICOLE KING; University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
THOMAS BOSCH; Christian-Albrechts University-Kiel, Kiel, Germany
TOMISLAV DOMAZET-LOSO; Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zabreg, Croatia
ANGELA DOUGLAS; Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Description:
Research in microbiology over the last 20 years has convincingly demonstrated that the vast diversity of life is microbial, and that the evolution of plants and animals during the most recent 20% of the earth's history has occurred as a patina upon a microbe-dominated landscape. In addition, emerging data are revealing that, to maintain their health and the stability of their associated ecosystems, plants and animals require coevolved interactions with the microbial world. Integration of these recent and seminal discoveries across the discipline of biology is critical for all aspects of the life sciences, from evolutionary to biomedical to environmental biology; however, such a revolution in thought will be impossible without important changes in the basic fabric of the discipline. Specifically, over the last 50 years subspecialties have taken highly divergent trajectories. The resulting intellectual 'siloing', together with the current structures of departments and professional societies, has made it increasingly difficult to create the kind of synthetic approaches essential to biology in the 21st century. This plenary session highlights the efforts of an international group of scientists, working through the NSF-supported National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, to define mechanisms by which to catalyze this change in conceptual framework in biology.



Special Interest Session
A Century of Bacteriophages
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Developed by the Center for the History of Microbiology/ASM Archives

Conveners:
JAMES A. POUPARD; Pharma Institute of Philadelphia,Inc., Philadelphia, PA
Invited Speakers:
WILLIAM C. SUMMERS; Yale University, New Haven, CT

Description:
This is the annual History of Microbiology Lecture, sponsored by the Center for the History of Microbiology/ASM Archives. Bacteriophages were first recognized by Felix d'Herelle in 1916, but his first encounter with their effects was in 1911-1912 when he noted "cultural irregularities" of interest when he was studying Coccobacillus acridiorum. Thus, one can reasonably claim that 2012 might be the centennial of the bacteriophage phenomenon. The history of phage is one that is embedded in the study of epizootics: phage are infections of bacterial populations. This early focus quickly led d'Herelle to employ them as antibacterial agents, just as he was using C. acridioruman anti-locust epizootic infection. The first third of the century of phage was devoted to this therapeutic application of these biological antibiotics. In the middle third of its history, phage were studied as biological objects in their own right. The "nature" of phage was central to the development of modern molecular biology and understanding of the so-called "central dogma." Phages have played a central role in gene engineering and biotechnology, based on this knowledge. In more recent years, attention has returned to the role phages play in diseases and large and small ecosystems. This lecture will provide a chronology of the past century of phage research, but also highlight changing emphasis, changing styles of research, and changing importance of research questions, all related to the ubiquitous bacteriophage.



Chromosome Structure and Dynamics
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
SANKAR ADHYA; National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

Invited Speakers:
STEVEN D. GOODMAN; University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
ANDREW A. TRAVERS; MRC-LMB, Cambridge, United Kingdom
JASON BRICKNER; Northwestern University, Chicago, IL

Description:
The recent explosion in technology has resulted in the accumulation of immense amounts of information relating to patterns of gene expression in both bacteria and eukaryotes but has left largely unanswered the central question of how these patterns of gene expression are related to the 3D organization and dynamics of the chromosome. To answer this question requires knowledge of the 3D structure of the chromosome and of how this structure might influence gene expression. In both bacteria and eukaryotes there is strong evidence that the chromosomal DNA does not exist as a random jumble but instead is organized into discrete regions - in bacteria these approximate to the macrodomains and in eukaryotes to chromosomal territories. We believe that the greatest advances in the understanding of gene expression in future years will come from an integration of the structural, bioinformatic and biochemical approaches to this problem. The subject remains one of the most important remaining questions in biology and this session will explore the concept that the information for forming an ordered chromatin structure is encoded in the DNA genome itself, and will enable the establishment of a coherent framework of concepts relating to how different regions of the DNA genome communicate with each other.



Cooperation and Conflict in Microbes
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
E. TOBY KIERS; Institute of Ecological Science, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Invited Speakers:
E. TOBY KIERS; Institute of Ecological Science, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands
STUART A. WEST; University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
JOAN E. STRASSMANN; Washington University, St. Louis, St. Louis, MO

Description:
The evolution of cooperation and cheating in microbes has received much theoretical and empirical attention in recent years. Microbes practice a variety of social behaviors involving complex systems of cooperation and communication. Why do microorganisms engage in these behaviors given that cooperative individuals can be exploited by selfish cheaters? Microbes provide novel experimental opportunities to answer this and other long-standing problems in evolution, such as horizontal transmission of genes and communication to coordinate cooperation. Understanding cooperation among microbes may shed light on the origin of multicellular life, and allow us to maximize benefits microbes provide to their hosts, such as agricultural plants. Understanding other kinds of cooperation can help us determine why pathogenic microbes become more deadly. Work in this area has demonstrated the importance of microbe relatedness, kin discrimination, and competition between relatives in driving the evolution of microbe behavior. Our understanding of the social lives of microbes has been revolutionized in the past decade; this symposium will explore these exciting advances.



CRISPR Interference: RNA-directed Adaptive Immunity in Bacteria and Archaea
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
LUCIANO A. MARRAFFINI; The Rockefeller University, New York, NY

Invited Speakers:
RODOLPHE BARRANGOU; Danisco, USA, Inc., Madison, WI
EMMANUELLE CHARPENTIER; Umea University, Umea, Sweden
KONSTANTIN SEVERINOV; Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ

Description:
In recent years, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) loci have been revealed to encode a novel genetic interference mechanism that uses small guide RNA molecules to defend archaea and bacteria from bacteriophage and plasmid invasion. This pathway also constitutes a primitive adaptive immune system, plays a fundamental role in the evolution of prokaryotes and has potential for both industrial and biomedical applications. In this symposium we will discuss (1) recent advances in our understanding of the mechanism of CRISPR interference and (2) the impact of CRISPR loci on lateral gene transfer and the evolution of bacteria. The symposium will provide a perspective on the present and future of this exciting field.



Ecology and Evolution of Unicellular Eukaryotes
3:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
NICOLE KING; University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA

Invited Speakers:
NICOLE KING; University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
LAURA KATZ; Smith College, Northhampton, MA, Division X Lecturer
THOMAS RICHARDS; Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom

Description:
The unicellular eukaryotes, long overshadowed by research on the plants and animals, have a deep evolutionary history and diverse ecological strategies. This session aims to address recent advances in the study of these fascinating organisms, from multiple branches of the tree of life – including the closest living relatives of animals, aquatic fungi and fungal-like microbial eukaryotes and other lineages. New insights will be presented regarding the ability of some unicellular eukaryotes to distinguish germline and somatic genomes, phylogenetic relationships among diverse enigmatic taxa, genome organization and evolution, and inter-species interactions.



Enviable Microbial Powers to Tap Earth's Energy
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
ANTJE BOETIUS; Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany
JOSEPH GRABER; U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Washington, DC

Invited Speakers:
ANTJE BOETIUS; Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany
JENNIFER PETT-RIDGE; Joint BioEnergy Institute, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Emeryville, CA
LARS PETER NIELSEN; Aarhus University, Department of Biological Sciences, Aarhus, Denmark

Description:
Microorganisms drive biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur on Earth. They are responsible for a significant proportion of Earth's biomass, for remineralization of organic matter, and for significant fluxes of several important climate-active gases, including CO₂, N₂O and CH₄. Bacteria and Archaea have evolved a plethora of metabolic pathways to tap Earth's energy, allowing them to live literally everywhere, and influencing substantially the chemistry that appear like visionary engineering solutions to humans' ever-increasing need for sustainable energy. These include for example generating hydrogen from sunlight, making fertilizer from air, and biofuel from cellulose, recycling refractory detritus to energy-rich food, switching from methane to hydrogen fuel cells, tapping the diffuse electricity of the seabed, and many more. Progress in this field is based on new technologies for the sensing of microbial processes on scales from cells to communities, improved insight into genomic functions, and interdisciplinary advances at the interface of physics, chemistry and biology. Studies presented will include examples from terrestrial and marine environments, with a focus on environmental microbiology and community ecology.



Evolution and Development of the Microbiome
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
MARIA GLORIA DOMINGUEZ-BELLO;University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico
RUTH LEY; Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Invited Speakers:
RUTH LEY; Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
MARIA GLORIA DOMINGUEZ-BELLO; University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico
STEPHAN SCHUSTER; Penn State University, State College, PA

Description:
Our understanding of the development of the microbiome within a host, as well as the evolution of the microbiome both within the human species and more broadly throughout the mammals, is now being profoundly transformed by studies collecting thousands of sequences from each of thousands of samples. In this session, we highlight these recent studies that aim at understanding the human microbiome from an evolutionary and ecological view, including comparative studies among human groups and among vertebrates, and the evolution of individual members of the microbiome. The session will thus offer an especially broad and multidisciplinary view of the microbiome, which will go far beyond the knowledge gained in the individual fields of clinical microbiology, microbial ecology, and genomics to provide a broad synthesis.



Expanding the Metabolic Blueprint
3:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
MECKY POHLSCHRÖDER; University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Invited Speakers:
JOSEPH KRZYCKI; The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, Division K Lecturer
DANIEL AMADOR-NOGUEZ; Princeton University, Princeton, NJ
BERNHARD PALSSON; University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, Promega Biotechnology Research Award

Description:
Our understanding of microbial physiology and metabolism is being revolutionized by genome enabled and systems biology approaches. These approaches combined with traditional microbial physiology and genetic studies are providing an unprecedented view into the novel biochemistry of microbes, and the complexity of their metabolic networks. This session will highlight several major advances in the field. Attendees will learn about pyrrolysine, the twenty-second amino acid, which is necessary for all known pathways of methane formation from methylamines by methanogenic Archaea and which redefines the genetic code of Archaea. The ground-breaking use of metabolomics to study metabolic transitions in bacterial systems will also be addressed. One focus will be the regulation of the acidogenic-solventogenic transition in C. acetobutylicum. Finally, systems biology has led to the formulation of mechanistic metabolic genotype-phenotype relationships for microbes. The last talk will summarize this development that has been 15 years in the making including the basic and applied uses of such relationships.



The Microbiome of Nature's Vampires: Roles in Health and Disease
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
JOERG GRAF; University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
CLAY FUQUA; Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

Invited Speakers:
CLAY FUQUA; Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, Division I Lecturer
JOERG GRAF; University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
SHANNON BENNETT; California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, CA

Description:
Animals such as ticks, leeches and mosquitoes feed on blood, giving them the unique ability to directly inject microbes into the animals they feed on. As blood is deficient in key nutrients, such as vitamin B, symbiotic bacteria are considered critical in providing these to the host. In this symposium, we will present both sides of these interactions, the human pathogens and the microbiome. The pathogens can be interlopers that utilize sangivorous animals as a vector or members of the microbiome that are opportunistic pathogens. The Division I lecture by Dr. Clay Fuqua will focus on the diversity and dynamics of endogenous microbial communities of ixodid ticks and their potential impact on pathogen transmission. The contribution of the medicinal leech microbiome to host physiology and its potential to cause wound infections during leech therapy will be explored. In the next invited lecture, the evolution of the mosquito-transmitted dengue virus during epidemics will be described. Additional talks covering other aspects of microbes associated with blood-feeding animals will be selected from the abstracts.



New Biological Questions Brought by Species Pangenomes
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
LAURENCE ROHMER; University of Washington, Seattle, WA
MICHAEL A. JACOBS; University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Invited Speakers:
LAURENCE ROHMER; University of Washington, Seattle, WA
CHRISTINE CITTI; Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Toulouse, France, Division G Lecturer
DAVID USSERY; Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark

Description:
High-throughput sequencing is radically changing the way we do research in biology. This session will discuss the utilization of genome sequences to tackle questions that could not be answered with traditional techniques and is aimed at communicating to biologists the potential of these new methods. More specifically, the role of high-throughput sequencing is particularly important to investigate the relationship between bacteria and their environment. The analysis of species pan-genomes is uncovering new information about functions necessary for bacteria to thrive in given habitats. In addition, the impact of an environment on bacterial evolution can now easily be followed by massive parallel sequencing, both in laboratory and environmental conditions. For example, this brings novel insight on the advent and unfolding of pathogens outbreaks and bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Hence these new approaches show great potential to drive new discoveries in medical microbiology and environmental microbiology.



Parallels in Innate Immune Responses to Bacterial and Viral Infections
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
LOU LAIMINS; Northwestern University, Chicago, IL

Invited Speakers:
RUSSELL VANCE; University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
LOU LAIMINS; Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, Division S Lecturer
JOHN PATTON; National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD, Division T Lecturer

Description:
Both bacteria and viruses need to evade innate immune surveillance to establish productive infections. There exist many similarities in how viruses and bacteria target innate immune surveillances as well as significant differences and these will be highlighted in this session. This topic will be of great interest to the members attending the ASM meeting, as it will address important mechanisms used by viruses and bacteria in microbial pathogenesis.



Phagocytes: Heroes and Victims of Infection
3:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
MARY O’RIORDAN; University of Michigan Medical School; Ann Arbor, MI

Invited Speakers:
DANIEL PORTNOY; University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, Division E Lecturer
PETER MURRAY; St. Judes Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN
MARY O’RIORDAN; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Description:
Phagocytes, such as macrophages, are early responders to microbial invasion, and play a pivotal role in the outcome of infection. These innate immune cells have potent anti-microbial functions triggered by recognition of microbial components. Phagocytes are also essential for educating other cells in the immune system to stimulate effective immunity. However, macrophages can be targeted by pathogens to serve as reservoirs of microbial replication or to derail signaling, resulting in unproductive systemic immune responses. This session will elucidate molecular mechanisms that regulate early interactions of phagocytes with invading pathogens, providing a framework for interpreting the more complex consequences of infection.



Tuesday, June 19

PLENARY SESSIONS

Friend or Foe: Interorganismal Interactions in the Microbial World
8:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Convener:
PEGGY A. COTTER; University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

Invited Speakers:
JOSEPH MOUGOUS; University of Washington, Seattle, WA
PEGGY COTTER; University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
GEORGE SALMOND; University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
LUCIANO MARRAFFINI; The Rockefeller University, New York, NY
KEVIN FOSTER; University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom

Descriptions:
Microbes rarely live alone. Whether in or on eukaryotic hosts or in environmental niches, bacteria typically share their living spaces with other bacteria, bacteriophages andeukaryotic microbes. Interactions between bacteria and other organisms, including members of the same species, may be cooperative or competitive. Discoveries in recent years have shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying these interactions. Two speakers in this session will describe how bacteria use specialized secretion systems (Two Partner Secretion systems and Type VI secretion systems) to kill some neighboring bacteria upon contact while sparing others. The contributions these systems make to the development of a polymicrobial community will be discussed. Two other speakers will describe how bacteria defend themselves against predation bybacteriophages. One will discuss how a toxin-antitoxin system is used as a phage abortive infection system and the other will discuss how CRISPRs function as bacterial adaptive immune systems that prevent reinfection by viruses to which the bacteria have been exposed previously. Our fifth speaker will discuss interbacterial interactions from the perspective of sociobiology and social evolution. He will describe how bacteria can be used as models to understand complex social behaviors such ascooperativity, mutualism and spite.



Imagine a World without Viruses
8:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Convener:
CURTIS SUTTLE; University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada

Invited Speakers:
CURTIS SUTTLE; University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada
LUIS VILLAREAL; University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA
MARILYN ROOSSINCK; Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
JEAN MICHEL CLAVERIE; Aix-Maiseille University School of Medicine and Mediterranean Institute of Microbiology, Maiseille, France
GRAHAM HATFULL; University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA

Description:
What would the living world be like without viruses? If one considers viruses only as pathogens, the idea might sound quite attractive. But in fact, without viruses, the living world would be very different in some surprising ways. The speakers in this session will show why it is becoming increasingly clear that viruses must be considered as integral players in many biological processes. For a start, without viruses, complex organisms like humans might never have evolved. The human genome would look entirely different without viruses – some estimates suggest that as much as 8% of the human genome may be viral in origin. Viruses are by far the most numerous entities in the biosphere - the ocean alone is thought to contain ~4X1030 viruses, containing as much carbon as 75 million blue whales! Because of the role marine viruses play in controlling the populations of marine microbes, they are significant players in biogeochemical cycles. Viruses’ biological roles extend far beyond simply killing cells; viruses can also help their hosts. The realization that viruses can serve as co-evolved, beneficial symbionts offers exciting possibilities for applications in many fields including human and animal health, crop productivity and biotechnology.



Synthetic Biology
8:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Convener:
DANIELLE TULLMAN-ERCEK; University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA

Invited Speakers:
LINGCHONG YOU; Duke University, Durham, NC
JEFF HASTY; University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA
MICHELLE CHANG; University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
PAMELA SILVER; Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

Description:
The combination of advances in DNA synthesis, DNA sequencing, the quantitative measurement of biological systems, and computing power have enabled the rise of the field of Synthetic Biology: the rigorous application of engineering principles to the design of biological systems. Inherent in such an engineering design goal is 1) the creation of modular, biological parts that can be assembled to make devices that exhibit controlled dynamical or logical behavior, and 2) the ability to predict complex, systems-level behavior in cells or populations. This session will highlight recent successes of Synthetic Biology in bacterial systems, and their application to areas such as alternative energy, biochemical production, and therapeutics.



Who's in Charge? How Microbes Affect Animal Behavior
8:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Convener:
KEVIN R. THEIS; Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI

Invited Speakers:
KEVIN R. THEIS; Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
EUGENE ROSENBERG; Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
ROCHELLYS DIAZ HEIJTZ; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
DAVID P. HUGHES; Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

Description:
All animals intimately associate with symbiotic microbes and it has been suggested that the genetic contributions of these microbes are orders of magnitude greater than those of their hosts. As such, the potential effects of microbes on animal biology appear near infinite and, as a seemingly paradigm-shifting consequence, animals are increasingly being viewed as holobionts or supraorganisms rather than as isolated entities. The aim of this plenary session is to enhance and expand our collective knowledge of how symbiotic microbes shape the behavior of their animal hosts in both beneficial and harmful ways. For animals, behavior is the sole means for mediating their situation and position within dynamic environments, so developing proximate and ultimate understandings of symbionts’ influences on host behavior is an important phase in the maturation of animal biology. This session features an international panel of transdisciplinary scientists who will discuss how microbes influence the locomotive, reproductive, communicative and emotive behaviors of their hosts, and furthermore how they shape the evolution and structure of animal societies. Collectively, the cutting edge research of these scientists illustrates the transcendent developments occurring at the interface of behavioral, microbial and evolutionary ecology.



Small Words, Big Impact: Intercellular Communication Among Bacteria
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
MICHAEL J. FEDERLE; University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL

Invited Speakers:
E. PETER GREENBERG; University of Washington, Seattle, WA, D.C. White Research and Mentoring Award
MATTHEW NEIDITCH; University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ
VANESSA SPERANDIO; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX

Description:
Bacterial cell-to-cell communication, commonly referred to as quorum sensing, is now recognized to be a common means by which bacteria coordinate gene regulation and group behavior. The types of processes continue to expand, and includes control of multi-species biofilm development, bistability in population dynamics, and biowarfare between species. Regulation of cell-cell communication is also fascinating and can involve multiple signaling molecules, small regulatory RNAs, and intracellular second-messenger compounds. Important questions to explore include: how diverse is the bacterial chemical lexicon, how are signals delivered between cells, how are they detected robustly, how is information encoded in molecules transformed into a response, what is the set of processes controlled by communication, how did these collective behaviors evolve and how do they avoid exploitation, can communication be interrupted or manipulated for medical or industrial purposes?



Special Interest Session
How ASM Learned to Write Evidence-based Practice Guidelines: Applying the CDC LMBP Process to Bloodstream Infections
11:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Developed by the Committee on Professional Practice

Convener:
ALICE WEISSFELD; Microbiology Specialists, Inc., Houston, TX

Invited Speakers:
ALICE WEISSFELD; Microbiology Specialists, Inc., Houston, TX
NANCY CORNISH; CDC, Atlanta, GA
DONNA WOLK; University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
MICHAEL SAUBOLLE; Arizona/Banner Health, Phoenix, AZ
MEL WEINSTEIN; Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ

Description:
One of the key initiatives of the new Committee on Professional Practice is to establish an ASM process for examining evidence surrounding key issues in clinical microbiology. This symposium will describe how the first guideline was written.



Special Interest Session
The Practice of Clinical Microbiology in Pediatrics
11:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Developed by the Public and Scientific Affairs Board

Conveners:
CAREY-ANN BURNHAM; Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
CHRIS DOERN; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX

Invited Speakers:
CHRIS DOERN; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
CAREY-ANN BURNHAM;Washington University inSt. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis Children's Hospital, St. Louis, MO
PAULA REVELL; Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
PHIL TARR; Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis Children's Hospital, St. Louis, MO
STEPHANIE FRITZ; Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO

Description:
This symposium will focus on five contemporary, challenging issues faced by those who practice pediatric specifically clinical microbiology. The epidemiology of pediatric diseases, such as the agents of bacteremia in the post vaccine era as well as C. difficile which has implications in the practice of clinical microbiology. In addition, the introduction of new diagnostic methodologies and laboratory best practices in pediatrics will be reviewed.



All's Well that Ends and Mends Well: Maintenance of Genomic Integrity
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
STEPHEN KOWALCZYKOWSKI; University of California at Davis, Davis, CA

Invited Speakers:
VICKI LUNDBLAD; Salk Institute for Biological Studies, San Diego, CA, Division H Lecturer
WOLF-DIETRICH HEYER; University of California at Davis, Davis, CA
STEPHEN KOWALCZYKOWSKI; University of California at Davis, Davis, CA

Description:
Maintaining genomic integrity is an essential aspect of life. The DNA in all organisms can become broken during the course of normal cellular replication, and the ends of linear chromosomes in particular, without the function of telomerase, would be a source of persistent DNA breaks. This session will cover molecular and cellular aspects of genome maintenance. One topic will be the essential function of telomerase, an enzyme charged with the responsibility of replicating DNA at the ends of chromosome;telomeredysfunction in humans leads to many pathologies. Other topics will include the mechanism and regulation of DNA-break repair, a multi-component biological pathway designed to restore, with high fidelity, integrity to broken DNA. As with telomerase, the orthologues of many microbial genes involved in recombinational DNA repair are associated with tumor suppression. The connections between DNA replication, recombinational repair and telomere function will be featured.



Beyond the Central Dogma: Diversity in Regulation of Gene Expression
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
JÖRG VOGEL; Universität Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany

Invited Speakers:
JÖRG VOGEL; Universität Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
MARLENE BELFORT; Wadsworth Center, Albany, NY
TANIA BAKER; Massachussetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

Description:
The tenets of the Central Dogma of Molecular Biology were first put forth in the late 1950's, and held that the transfer of genetic information from DNA to protein (via RNA) was unidirectional. Since this time, we have come to understand that the replication and the expression of genetic information can be regulated in myriad ways that fall outside this dogma. This session will focus on recent advances in our understanding of such molecular mechanisms, including the role of small non-coding RNA,proteolysis, DNA mobility, and RNA splicing.



Biodegradation: Application of Basics to Real-world Problems
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
ELIZABETH EDWARDS; University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Invited Speakers:
ELIZABETH EDWARDS; University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
MICHAEL HYMAN; North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
LORENZ ADRIAN; Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research (UFZ), Leipzig, Germany

Description:
One approach to remediating persistent organic chemical pollutants in the environment is their degradation to harmless products by aerobic or anaerobic microorganisms. While much progress has been made studying biodegradation in a laboratory setting, it is not always clear whether these studies are relevant to processes occurring in polluted habitats. This session will address understanding and manipulating microbial processes important to "real world" problems, such as the reductive dechlorination ofchloroorganic pollutants, anaerobic biodegradation of aromatics, and aerobic breakdown of the gasoline additive methyl tertiary butyl ether. In each of these cases fundamental information about microorganisms has influenced strategies to remediate toxic chemicals.



Frontiers in Experimental Evolution
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
DAVID A. STAHL; University of Washington, Seattle, WA
MATTHEW D. KANE; National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA

Invited Speakers:
KRISTINA HILLESLAND; University of Washington, Bothell, WA
PAUL TURNER; Yale University, New Haven, CT
DAN I. ANDERSSON; University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden

Description:
Microorganisms are the oldest, most abundant, and most diverse forms of life on Earth. This session will describe research at the frontier in understanding the origins, maintenance and consequences of this microbial diversity. Speakers will present a variety of talks in which microbes are the stars in experimental studies of evolutionary patterns and processes. Attendees will learn about how specific traits of microorganisms, such as short generation times, small genome sizes, and the ability to store and revive ancestral populations, study population mixture interactions, and directly quantify fitness and adaptation, all make microbes ideal model systems for experiments in manipulative evolution. Results of such studies not only help explain the history of life on Earth, but also contribute knowledge of great value to science and society.



The Limits to Microbial Life
3:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
MARY A. VOYTEK; National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC
MARK YOUNG; Montana State University, Bozeman, MT

Invited Speakers:
KATHY BENISON; Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI
JOHN HALLSWORTH; Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland
MARK YOUNG; Montana State University, Bozeman, MT

Description:
The complexity and robustness of the modern biosphere is a result of the dynamic interplay between genetic flexibility, metabolic capability and environmental challenges. Life survives and sometimes thrives under what seem to be harsh conditions on Earth. The study of the so called “extremophiles” challenges our concept of the limits of life, informs our quest for the comprehensive tree of life, and helps us to understand how evolution has taken place. This symposium will provideperspectives on the molecular, genetic, and biochemical mechanisms that control and limit evolution, metabolic diversity, and acclimatization of life here on Earth and will provideinsights for the search for life beyond Earth.



Microbial Glycobiology and Glycobiotechnology
3:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
RAJENDAR DEORA; Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC

Invited Speakers:
DOUGLAS CLARK; University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, Division O Lecturer
CHRISTINE SZYMANSKI; University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada
RAJENDAR DEORA; Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC

Description:
Glycans serve varied and important roles in the biology of microbes. As polysaccharide capsules and exopolysaccharides, they contribute to the pathogenicity and biofilm development in some species. They can be substrates for protein glycosylation –an activity once thought not to occur in bacteria – the prevalence and consequences of which are only just becoming understood. And, as cellulose and lignocellulose, glycans may serve as substrates for microbial conversion of plant biomass to fuel. This session will introduce attendees to the broad field of microbial glycobiology and its many biological and biotechnological implications.



New Paradigms in Bacterial Second Messenger Signaling
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
CHRIS WATERS; Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI

Invited Speakers:
URS JENAL; Biozentrum, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
CARL BAUER; Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
EMMANUELLE BOUVERET; LISM-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France

Description:
The last decade has seen the importance of second messenger signaling in bacteria grow tremendously, from the meteoric rise of cyclic di-GMP to the recently discovered cyclic di-AMP and even cyclic GMP. In addition to these newly appreciated signals, new insights regarding the mechanism and function of traditional second messengers have also been uncovered. It is now clear that second messenger signaling is integral to the control of many fundamental behaviors of bacteria includingbiofilm formation, stress adaptation, virulence, quorum sensing, and cell division. This symposium will highlight recent research regarding second messenger signaling in bacteria. Attendees will obtain a greater understanding of the family of bacterial second messengers, their integral role in the lives of bacteria, and the molecular mechanisms by which they modulate phenotypic responses.




Novel Cell Surface and Cell-Cell Interaction Targets for Antimicrobial Therapeutics
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
JENNY LODGE; Washington University School Medicine, St. Louis, MO

Invited Speakers:
BONNIE BASSLER; Princeton University, Princeton, NJ Division A Lecturer
CHRIS SASSETTI; HHMI, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA
JENNY LODGE; Washington University School Medicine, St. Louis, MO

Description:
The microbial surface is a key component in pathogenesis and intercellular communication. As such it is an attractive target for anti-microbial compounds. This session will focus on biosynthesis and regulation of microbial cell surface structures and intercellular communication mechanisms that are potential targets for anti-virulence strategies. The goal of the session is to highlight novel approaches and concepts for development of much needed anti-microbial therapeutics.



Patterns and Maintenance of Microbial Diversity
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
MARTIN POLZ; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

Invited Speakers:
JED FUHRMAN; University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
MARTIN POLZ; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, Division N Lecturer
WILLIAM HANAGE; Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

Description:
Microbes are extraordinarily diverse, not only in terms of their genetics and metabolism, but even in the fundamental evolutionary processes that give rise to their diversity. Understanding how these processes interact with ecology to produce the patterns we see in nature is one of the grand challenges of microbiology. We will explore recent advances in microbial community analysis and population genomics that move toward an integrated picture of the mechanisms that create and maintain diversity from complex communities of many species, to individual genomic lineages. Questions to be explored are: how finely tuned are microbial populations to their environment, and what is the role of abiotic and biotic interactions in creating community structure? What is the extent of genomic diversity within populations and how do mutation, recombination and horizontal gene transfer combine with selection to create it? Finally, what types of environmental and organismal interactions are responsible for selection of the high level of genomic diversity among closely related isolates within microbial populations? The session will also pay particular attention to novel technological advances both in sequencing and data analysis that have catapulted microbial community and population analysis to a new level.




Real-time Analysis of Host-Pathogen Interactions
3:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
IAN GLOMSKI; University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA

Invited Speakers:
JOANNE FLYNN; University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, Division U Lecturer
IAN GLOMSKI; University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA
R. MARK WOOTEN; University of Toledo College of Medicine, Toledo, OH

Description:
Classical methodologies for studying the interactions of bacterial pathogens with their hosts typically lack the ability to capture data at the cellular level in real time. Instead, they provide snap shots of events in asynchronously infected hosts or simplified tissue culture models of infection. This session will focus on the application of emergent technologies to study the interaction of bacterial pathogens with their respective hosts in real-time. The goal of the session is to highlight for attendees the unprecedented, and often unexpected, insights into the infectious process that these technologies provide.



The Role of Lipids in Bacterial Pathogenesis: Offensive and Defensive Strategies
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
BETH MCCORMICK; University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA
JASON HUNTLEY; University of Toledo College of Medicine, Toledo, OH

Invited Speakers:
SAM BEHAR; Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
JOHN LEONG; Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
META KUEHN; Duke University, Durham, NC

Description:
This session integrates an emerging area of investigation exploring the role of lipids during bacterial infections. Speakers will highlight the diversity and broad applicability of host and pathogen lipids during bacterial infections. Topic areas will range from the role of host lipids that control and/or promote disease, to bacterial lipids (membrane vesicles) that deliver virulence factors or toxins to host cells, to innovative vaccine development strategies using bacterial membrane vesicles. By including lipids in typically protein-dominated virulence factor paradigms, this session will provide attendees with new information to better understand host-pathogen interactions. The session is designed to appeal to microbiologists, cell biologists, and immunologists.


16 Jun - 19 Jun 2012

San Fransisco
United States of America
meeting website