Cell Biology of Early Mouse Development

Our aim is to focus upon aspects of cell biology central to early mouse development: the different types of cell division and their regulation; the importance of the physical organization of the cell towards developmental processes; and the cell biology of different cell: cell signaling events. In addressing the cellular basis underlying early mammalian development we will also seek input from other model systems to provide additional insight into relevant cell biological processes.

The mouse oocyte makes a key contribution to development in the form of maternal transcripts, shared meiotic and mitotic regulators. It is important to understand how its molecular architecture correctly configures the meiotic apparatus to segregate a haploid complement of chromosomes to the egg. Moreover these important cell divisions and those of the very early embryo are negotiated in the absence of centrioles at the spindle poles



Centrioles will only appear at the blastocyst stage and subsequently they will become essential for much more than cell division when they transform into basal bodies to template formation of primary cilia. In this way they will participate in many signaling events in the embryo after implantation.





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We have much to learn about the regulation of cell division in the early mammalian embryo. This can be informed from our knowledge of cell cycle regulation in a variety of somatic cell types where there is diversity in the regulation and roles of various cyclin dependent kinases and their cyclin partners. In many cell types there is redundancy of function of different Cdk/cyclins whereas other cells, for example pluripotent stem cells, have an absolute requirement for a particular complex.



The physical organisation of cells (their polarisation) is critical for regulation of division symmetry and fate decisions. Asymmetric cell divisions are instrumental in the very first cell fate decisions in the developing embryo and it is instructive to compare these with other systems in which asymmetric cell division has been well characterised. In many of these cases of division asymmetry, including those of the mouse embryo, one objective is to maintain a stem cell population. Division asymmetry is facilitated by asymmetric centrosomes and in the mouse embryo, this is achieved in the absence of centrioles

+ show speakers and program


Kathryn


Anderson


Sloan Kettering, New York


US




Richard


Behringer


M.D Anderson, Houston


US




Marco


Conti


University of California, San Francisco


US




Jurrien


Dean


NIH, Bethesda


US




Mel


DePamphilis


NIH, Bethesda


US




Scott


Fraser


Caltech, Pasedena


US




Richard


Gardner


University of York


UK




Tano


Gonzalez


IRB, Barcelona


ES




Anna-Katerina


Hadjantonakis


Sloan-Kettering Institute, New York


USA




Hiroshi


Hamada


University of Osaka


JP




Takashi


Hiiragi


EMBO, Heidelberg


DE




Sui


Huang


University of Calgary


CA




Keith


Jones


University of Newcastle


AU




Juergen


Knoblich


IMB, Viennna


AT




Michael


Lampson


University of Pennsylvania


US




Jibak


Lee


Kobe University


JP




Marcos


Malumbres


Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncológicas, Madrid


ES




Jenny


Nichols


University of Cambridge


UK




Jon


Pines


Gurdon Institute, Cambridge


UK




Liz


Robertson


University of Oxford


UK




Melina


Schuh


Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge


UK




Shongai


Shi


Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York


US




Peter


Sicinski


Dana Faber Cancer Center, Boston


US




Davor


Solter


Institute of Medical Biology


SG




Shahragim


Tajbakhsh


Institut Pasteur, Paris


FR




Patrick


Tam


Children's Hospital Westmead, Sydney


AU


9 Sep - 12 Sep 2012
Cambridge
United Kingdom
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