Ubiquitin & SUMO

The chief objective of this course is to present the state-of-the-art methodology for the analysis of ubiquitination and sumoylation to scientists who are unfamiliar with this field. This will involve practical experiments demonstrating the use of modifying enzymes and ubiquitin receptors in vitro, the identification and analysis of in vivo targets in mammalian cells and yeast, and a tutorial on predictive and search tools for the bioinformatic analysis of components of the ubiquitin system.

The post-translational modification of proteins by the covalent attachment of ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like (Ubl) modifiers was discovered many years ago. However this area of research is still among the most rapidly developing fields in cell biology.

One of the most intriguing features of the ubiquitin pathway is its emerging involvement in functions not directly related to protein degradation. close

The Ub/Ubl pathways regulate many biological processes and determine how cells respond to growth factors, stress and genetic damage, thus controlling nearly every facet of the life and death of a cell.

The covalent attachment of Ub or SUMO to proteins can alter their localization, activities, and ultimate fate. The study of ubiquitin family members is often difficult and requires specialised knowledge. For example, the isolation and in vivo analysis of ubiquitin and SUMO substrates is complicated by the presence of deconjugating enzymes whose activities need to be overcome. Strategies for the identification of modification sites or modifying enzymes vary depending on the type of target, and in vitro analysis requires proper isolation and handling of the relevant enzymes.
We will provide multidisciplinary training for young researchers and newcomers to the field through a competitive program. The course organisers are all experts in different aspects of ubiquitin/SUMO research. Participants will be encouraged to bring their own samples for on-site analysis in order to maximise the benefits for their own research. In addition, lectures by researchers who are leaders in the field will convey a wide range of background knowledge, covering both the basics of the ubiquitin and SUMO systems (biochemistry, structural biology and cell biology) and modern systems biology approaches (mass spectrometry and large genomic screens).


+ show speakers and program


Simona


Polo


IFOM – The FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology, Milan
simona.polo@ifom-ieo-campus.it


Italy




Helle


Ulrich


Cancer Research UK London Research Institute, London
helle.ulrich@cancer.org.uk


United Kingdom




Frauke


Melchior


University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg
f.melchior@zmbh.uni-heidelberg.de


Germany




Ivan


Dikic


Goethe University School of Medicine,
Frankfurt
ivan.dikic@biochem2.de


Germany




Kay


Hofmann


Memorec Biotec GmbH, Koeln
kay@miltenyibiotec.de


Germany




Aaron


Ciechanover


Vascular and Cancer Biology Research Center -Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa
c_tzachy@netvision.net.il


Israel




Wade


Harper


Department of Pathology
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
wade_harper@hms.harvard.edu


USA




Ron


Hay


College of Life Sciences
University of Dundee, Dundee
r.t.hay@dundee.ac.uk


United Kingdom




David


Komander


MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology,
Cambridge
dk@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk


United Kingdom


1 Sep - 8 Sep 2012
Sardinia
Italy
meeting website