Systems Approach to Metabolic Disease

In order to develop a complete understanding of a biological system, information must cover multiple dimensions. Over the last ten years, we have witnessed decisive advances in bioinformatics, genome sequencing, and high-throughput technologies, that have highlighted the need for approaching biological systems as a whole. Metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, as well as cancer, involve complex genetic, molecular, and environmental interactions, and systems-based approaches have proven to be instrumental in tackling this complexity by integrating genomic, molecular, and physiological data.

This meeting will provide a unique opportunity to bring together experts in systems biology and metabolism to discuss how ‘Omics’ approaches can be exploited in an effort to understand the perturbations that take place in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. We will discuss novel approaches for studying metabolic alterations in a high-throughput scale and explore how epigenomics, non-coding RNAs, and environmental factors control metabolic pathways in disease settings.
+ show speakers and program
Keynote Speaker

Matthias Mann, Max Planck Institute, Germany

Confirmed Speakers

Joe Bass, Northwestern University, USA
Benjamin Cravatt, The Scripps Research Institute, USA
Eyal Gottlieb, University of Glasgow, UK
David James, Garvan Institute, Australia
Mitch Lazar, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Jake Lusis, UCLA School of Medicine, USA
Ruth Loos, Mount Sinai Hospital, USA
Mark McCarthy, Oxford University, UK
Kathryn Moore, NYU Langone Medical Center, USA
Chris Newgard, Duke University School of Medicine, USA
Jens Nielsen, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden
Dan Rader, University of Pennsylvania, USA
John Rinn, Harvard University/The Broad Institute, USA
Markus Stoffel, ETH Zürich, Switzerland
Paolo Sassone-Corsi, University of California, USA
Kari Stefansson, deCODE genetics, Iceland

1 Oct - 3 Oct 2014
Chicago
United States of America
meeting website