Cortical interneurons in health and disease

The specific aim of this Workshop is to bring together world-class experts on very different aspects of the biology of cortical interneurons. We anticipate that this meeting may contribute to bridging the gap between different fields, leading to a better understanding of cortical interneurons in health and disease.

The neural assembly underlying the formation of functional networks in the cerebral cortex constitutes one of the most complex biological systems. Much of this complexity arises through the interaction of two distinct neuronal types, the glutamatergic projection neurons and gamma-aminobutyric containing (GABAergic) interneurons. Although neglected for a long time, interneurons are now thought to play a major role in the function of the cerebral cortex.


The neural assembly underlying the formation of functional networks in the cerebral cortex constitutes one of the most complex biological systems. Much of this complexity arises through the interaction of two distinct neuronal types, the glutamatergic projection neurons and gamma-aminobutyric containing (GABAergic) interneurons. Although neglected for a long time, interneurons are now thought to play a major role in the function of the cerebral cortex.
In this workshop, we will bring together world- sclass scholars with very different perspectives on the biology of cortical interneurons, from developmental neurobiology to systems neuroscience. Through this collective endeavor, we will try to answer some of the most fundamental questions related to the organization and function of the cerebral cortex.

The meeting program has been organized to avoid clustering around classical disciplines (e.g. anatomy, physiology, systems, etc.) and to encourage the synergistic interaction of speakers with different perspectives. To this aim, the program is organized in six sessions, each of which will address an important question in the field, such as “What is the role of interneurons in brain rhythms?” or “How does cortical interneuron dysfunction contribute to disease?”

With this organization we also want to encourage the contribution of all participants, as every session will benefit from the input provided from different perspectives. For each session, invited speakers and selected participants will give oral presentations on recent progress from their own research. In addition, there will be two poster sessions in which the remaining participants will present their work.


+ show speakers and program
Stewart
Anderson
Cornell University
USA

Scott
Baraban
University of California
USA

Bita
Moghaddam
University of Pittsburgh
USA

Ed
Callaway
Salk Institute
USA

Jessica
Cardin
Yale University
USA

Javier
DeFelipe
Instituto Cajal
Spain

Elodie
Fino
College de France
France

Gord
Fishell
New York University
USA

Nathaniel
Heintz
Rockefeller University
USA

Takao
Hensch
Harvard University
USA

Josh
Huang
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
USA

Yasuo
Kawaguchi
National Institute for Physiological Sciences
Japan

Nicoletta
Kessaris
University College London
UK

David
Lewis
University of Pittsburgh
USA

Hannah
Monyer
University of Heidelberg
Germany

Holly
Moore
Columbia University
USA

Tom
Mrsic-Flogel
University College London
UK

Kazunori
Nakajima
Keio University
Japan

Carl
Petersen
École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne
Suiza

Beatriz
Rico
Instituto de Neurociencias
Spain

Shongai
Shi
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
USA

Vikaas
Sohal
University of California San Francisco
USA

Thomas
Súdhof
Stanfor University
USA

Gabor
Tamas
University Szeged
Hungary

Peter
Uhlhass
Max-Planck Institute for Brain Research
Germany


24 Jun - 27 Jun 2012
Mallorca
Spain
meeting website