113th General Meeting

113th General Meeting
+ show speakers and program
SATURDAY, MAY 18

Opening Session
5:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Speakers:
FRANCES H. ARNOLD; California Institut of Technology, Pasadena, CA
(ASM LECTURER)
CHRISTINE JACOBS-WAGNOR; Yale University, New Haven, CT
NATHAN WOLFE; Metabiota, San Francisco, CA


SUNDAY, MAY 19

PLENARY SESSIONS

Intricacies of Host-Microbe Co-evolution
8:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Convener:
VICTOR J. TORRES; New York Univ. Sch. of Med., New York, NY

Invited Speakers:
JAYNE RAPER; Hunter Coll., New York, NY
JEROEN SAEIJ; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA
Division AA Lecturer
NELS C. ELDE; Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
VICTOR J. TORRES; New York Univ. Sch. of Med., New York, NY
DAVID B. GOLDSTEIN; Duke Univ., Durham, NC

Description:
Commensal and pathogenic microbes have evolved to live and replicate within host tissues. Therefore mammalian environments have exerted strong selection pressure over microbes which can be reflected in their genomes and determine host range and virulence properties. Microbial infection has also exerted strong selection pressure on animals and these traits can facilitate resistance or susceptibility to microbial infection. In this session we will explore examples by which bacteria, viruses, and parasites avoid host killing by targeting specific molecules and/or pathways involved in anti-microbial responses. In addition, we will also examine how mammalian genomic diversity affects the host response to microbial infections and influence the outcome of infection.



Pumping at the Microbial Well for Fuels, Chemicals and Materials
8:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Conveners:
JOY DORAN-PETERSON; Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA
GEORGE GARRITY; Michigan St. Univ., East Lansing, MI

Invited Speakers:
Jay D. Keasling; Univ. of California - Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
Promega Biotechnology Research Award Lecturer
THOMAS JEFFRIES; Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
Division O Lecturer
ANDREW ALLEN; J. Craig Venter Inst., San Diego, CA
TBD

Description:

Microorganisms produce a wide variety of products that may be used for fuels, biochemicals, and bio-based materials. Advances in metabolic pathway engineering, synthetic biology, information processing, mathematical modeling, and gene expression regulatory networks have enabled a variety of new technologies to push the frontier of bio-based materials forward at a rapid pace. Attendees will hear experts in the field describe their latest methods development and applications of new techniques for understanding microbial processes including metabolism, gene regulation, and capturing the synthetic power of biology to build microbial chemical factories.


Putting “omics” to the Test
8:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Convener:
JOERG GRAF; Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Invited Speakers:
EDWARD F. DELONG; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA
DAVID A. STAHL; Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA
Division N Lecturer
NICOLE DUBILIER; Max Planck Inst. of Marine Microb., Bremen, Germany
Division I Lecturer
JULIA VORHOLT; ETH, Zürich, Switzerland
THOMAS E. SHENK; Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ

Description:
Genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic approaches are transforming all fields of microbiology. ‘Omic approaches can provide an overview of the physiology of microbes and microbial communities that leads to the development of testable hypotheses. In this session, marine and terrestrial environments; microbemicrobe, microbe-plant and microbe-animal interactions; and beneficial and pathogenic associations will be investigated using ‘omic techniques. The presentations in this session will describe how hypotheses generated by these approaches were tested experimentally revealing new insight into in vivo physiology.


Translating Knowledge of Bacterial Pathogenesis into the Next Generation Antimicrobials
8:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Convener:
GERARD J. NAU; Univ. of Pittsburgh Sch. of Med., Pittsburgh, PA

Invited Speakers:
BRUCE R. LEVIN; Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA
Division A Lecturer
KIM LEWIS; Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA
HELEN E. BLACKWELL; Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
SUZANNE M.J. FLEISZIG; Univ. of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
DONALD T. MOIR; Microbiotix, Inc., Worcester, MA

Description:
Antibiotic resistance among human pathogens is an ever-increasing problem with global public health implications. Fewer new antibiotics, however, are being developed to combat antibiotic resistant pathogens. Compounding the deficit of new therapies is a lack of new targets and new mechanisms of action. Fundamental insights into microbiology, how bacteria develop drug resistance, and how they cause disease are fertile grounds for discovering the next generation of novel antimicrobial compounds. Attendees will learn about the discovery of new targets and new compounds to tackle the problem of antibiotic resistance. Approaches described by the speakers harness knowledge from basic studies in microbiology, chemistry, and evolutionary biology. The perspectives of both academic and industry labs will also be represented.


SPECIAL INTEREST SESSIONS

Accomplishments and Legacy of the Soviet Biological Weapons Program, 1928-1992
11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Developed by the Center for the History of Microbiology/ASM Archives Committee

Convener:
JAMES A. POUPARD; Pharma Inst. of Philadelphia, Inc., Philadelphia, PA

Invited Speakers:
RAYMOND A. ZILINSKAS; Ctr. for Nonproliferation Studies, Monterey Inst. of Intl. Studies, Monterey, CA

Description:
The session’s main objective is to describe and explain the Soviet Union’s biological warfare (BW) program as directed against humans, from its origins in the late 1920s to the USSR’s dissolution in December 1991, paying especial attention to its accomplishments related to weaponized bacterial and viral pathogens. The session will also clarify the possible threats that the program’s remnants, as lodged in present day Russian Ministry of Defense’s secret biological research institutes, pose to world peace.



Early Microbe Hunters Overcoming Biases and Barriers
11:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Co-Developed by the Center for the History of Microbiology/ASM Archives Committee, Committee on the Status of Women in Microbiology, the Committee on Microbiological Issues Impacting Minorities, and the Underrepresented Members Committee

Conveners:
JOAN W. BENNETT; Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ
MARIAN JOHNSON-THOMPSON; Univ. of District of Columbia, Washington, DC

Invited Speakers:
ARTURO CASADEVALL; Albert Einstein Coll. of Med. of Yeshiva Univ., Bronx, NY
LORRAINE A. FINDLAY; Nassau County Comm. Coll. and Univ. Med. Ctr., Garden City, NY
CLIFFORD W. HOUSTON; Univ. of Texas Med. Branch, Galveston, TX
ALICE S. HUANG; California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA
MARIAN JOHNSON-THOMPSON; Univ. of District of Columbia, Washington, DC

Description:
The earliest microbiologists were nearly all men with roots in European culture. Nevertheless, from its earliest years, microbiology has attracted many remarkable women and minorities who had to overcome unusual hurdles in order to become professionals. Nowadays we work to attract and retain diverse populations into scientific careers. By studying the history of our profession and by examining the motivations, experiences and educational paths that allowed pioneer “outsider” microbiologists to overcome the biases and barriers inherent in the culture of microbiology, we can learn lessons that can be applied to contemporary recruitment and retention efforts. We can also learn the significance of diversity in advancing microbiology.



Oceans and Human Health: The Microbiological Perspective
11:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Developed by the Public and Scientific Affairs Board, Committee on Environmental Microbiology

Convener:
D. JAY GRIMES; Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Oceans Springs, MS

Invited Speakers:
D. JAY GRIMES; Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Oceans Springs, MS
ERIN K. LIPP; Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA
SANDRA MCLELLAN; Univ. of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI
MARK HAMANN; Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS
HANS PAERL; Univ. of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
PAM MORRIS; Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC

Description:
Oceans interact with humans in both positive and negative ways and this interaction has become the foundation for an emerging "metadiscipline" called Oceans and Human Health. Several of the many disciplines comprising OHH include oceanography, waterborne and seafood borne diseases, harmful algal blooms, epidemiology, comparative animal physiology, natural products and synthetic organic chemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, social sciences, engineering, and other ocean-related areas. This session will focus on the microbiological aspects of OHH, both harmful and beneficial effects.



Saving the World with Microbes: Science for Diplomacy and Sustainable Development
11:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Developed by the International Board

Conveners:
E. WILLIAM COLGLAZIER; US Dept. of State, Washington, DC
MAY CHU; Ctrs. for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA

Invited Speakers:
TBD

Description:
The scientific community’s ability to inform policy objectives with scientific advice will become increasingly integral to policy decision making processes as food shortages, scarce water supply, increased energy demands and the spread of disease dictate the future health and security of the global population. The common language of science creates new pathways for collaboration and enables the flow of scientific information between nations and societies whose relations might otherwise be limited. As such, science diplomacy facilitated by ASM can contribute to enhanced collaboration across national, political, and cultural boundaries, defining and addressing emerging challenges that cannot be solved by individual nations. ASM members are in a unique position to contribute expertise and mobilize targeted solutions by engaging the international scientific community through research, innovation, and evidence-based policy making to meet common global health and environmental challenges. This not only meets the highest mission of the Society, but also supports its growth and evolution.



SYMPOSIA

The Bug Stops Here: Cellular Barriers to Infection
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
SERGE MOSTOWY; Imperial Coll., London, United Kingdom
MARC LECUIT; Inst. Pasteur, Inserm; Paris Descartes Univ., Paris, France

Invited Speakers:
XAVIER NASSIF; Inserm, Necker-Enfants Malades Univ. Hosp., Paris Descartes Univ., Paris, France
GlaxoSmithKline International Member of the Year Award Lecturer
MARC LECUIT; Inst. Pasteur, Inserm, Paris Descartes Univ., Paris, France
SERGE MOSTOWY; Imperial Coll., London, United Kingdom

Description:
A complete understanding of the molecules and mechanisms restricting microbial dissemination has not been obtained. Understanding how host cells are targeted by microbes, and how host cells respond to control infections is key to unraveling the pathophysiology of infectious diseases. This session, entitled ‘Cellular Barriers to Infection’, shall highlight recently discovered mechanisms by which pathogens interact with cells and tissues, and how the host-microbe interplay may favor either microbial dissemination or its control. Talks on microbial interactions with endothelial barriers, mucosal barriers, and cell-autonomous responses to infection will be presented. Additional talks will be selected from the submitted abstracts. Completion of this session will provide insights into the mechanisms required for the control of infection by host responses. It should also suggest the development of new strategies aimed at combating infectious diseases, and possibly other human diseases arising from a dysfunctional host immune response.


Chemical Microbiology: Opening New Doors in Microbiology using Chemistry
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
DOUG WEIBEL; Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI

Invited Speakers:
LAURA KIESSLING; Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI
SUZANNE WALKER; Harvard Med. Sch., Boston, MA
ERIN CARLSON; Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN

Description:
Rapid progress in microbiology over the last century has been matched with advances in chemistry. Chemistry laid the foundation for early studies of bacterial cell biology. The discovery and characterization of bioactive compounds provided unique opportunities for regulating proteins in vivo and a new experimental approach to decipher aspects of bacterial physiology that include cell wall assembly, replication, and division. The use of small molecules for studying bacteria can be traced back to the introduction of the beta-lactam antibiotics as potent inhibitors of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. As the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of the beta-lactam antibiotics approaches, microbiology is at a unique position to assess the broad capabilities that chemistry brings to the study of microbes--a multidisciplinary area that we refer to as chemical microbiology. Many classes of small molecules and macromolecular polymers are agonists and antagonists of specific biomolecules, are available to microbiologists, and enable the regulation of specific machinery in cells. This session is designed to reinforce the connection between these fields and highlight cutting edge research in microbiology that is facilitated by chemistry.


Citizen Microbiology: Enhancing Microbiology Education and Research with the Help of the Public
3:00 p.m.- 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
JONATHAN EISEN; Univ. of California-Davis, Davis, CA
DAVID COIL; Univ. of California-Davis, Davis, CA

Invited Speakers:
GRAHAM HATFULL; Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
Carski Foundation Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching Award and Division W Lecturer
DARLENE CAVALIER; Sci. Starter, Sci. Cheerleader, Philadelphia, PA
ROB DUNN; North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC

Description:
Citizen Science is a valuable way to both generate scientific data and to engage and educate a broad audience. Some areas of biology such as astronomy and ornithology have conducted multiple successful citizen science projects over the years. Surprisingly, there are not many citizen science projects in microbiology even though microbes are of interest to the majority of the public, as well as being tractable for these kinds of studies. This session will focus on citizen science in microbiology. This session will examine the diversity of Citizen Science projects, outline what makes a successful project, and highlight examples of past, current and future Citizen Microbiology projects. Speakers will also provide details on overcoming challenges in Citizen Science (e.g., visualization, permissions, privacy, standardization, informed consent). Our belief is that more projects, throughout the different domains of microbiology, could benefit from incorporating a citizen science component. Having this session at the General Meeting will help bring together people interested in this topic, as well as fostering collaboration on existing and future citizen science projects.


Experimental Evolution
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
FRANK ROSENZWEIG; Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT

Invited Speakers:
MICHAEL DESAI; Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA
PAUL SNIEGOWSKI; Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
SANTIAGO F. ELENA; Inst. de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, Valencia, Spain

Description:
The past quarter century has witnessed a dramatic increase in the use of microorganisms to study evolution experimentally in the lab. Microbes reproduce quickly, exhibit astonishing ecological diversity, and can be easily propagated and cryogenically preserved. Experimental microbial evolution has illuminated molecular structure-function relationships, sharpened our understanding of constraints governing metabolism, and made it possible to explore the rate, tempo and repeatability of processes leading to adaptation, sex, mutualism, multicellularity, chronic disease and the origin of new species. These studies, now wed to genomics are providing insight into the evolutionary process at unprecedented resolution. If “Nothing in Biology makes sense except in the light of evolution,” experiments using microbes are the best way to make sense of evolution in real time. In this session we will learn how the experimental approach is revolutionizing our understanding of adaptation, recombination and mutation rates, speciation and the transition from unicellular to multicellular life forms.


Hooking Up in the Ocean
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
GERHARD J. HERNDL; Univ. of Vienna, Vienna, Austria

Invited Speakers:
FAROOQ AZAM; Scripps Inst. of Oceanography, San Diego, CA
DC White Research and Mentoring Award Lecturer
RACHEL FOSTER; Max-Planck Inst. for Marine Microbiol., Bremen, Germany
ROMAN STOCKER; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Boston, MA

Description:
There is a growing body of literature indicating that marine pelagic microbes are interacting with other microbes, eukaryotes and metazoans in the seemingly homogeneous oceanic water column. Microbes are often attached to other organisms (microbes, zooplankton, phytoplankton) and these associations and the interactions that these associations incur may play an important role in pelagic ecology. In this session, examples will be given demonstrating that these synergistic interactions are widespread and influence the biochemical cycling of matter in the ocean.


Immune Evasion by Persistent and Latent Pathogens
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
JYOTHI RENGARAJAN; Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA

Invited Speakers:
JOHN CHAN; Albert Einstein Coll. of Med., Bronx, NY
Division U Lecturer
CORRIE DETWEILER; Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO
MICHAEL J. GALE JR.; Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA

Description:
The immune response to microbes does not always result in clearance and several pathogens have evolved complex strategies that allow them to persist in the host and prevent their elimination by the immune system. Infections caused by persistent and latent pathogens are a major global health burden. Understanding the mechanisms employed by these pathogens to evade detection and persist within the host for prolonged periods of time is critical for designing therapeutics and vaccines to effectively control persistent and latent infections. This symposium will bring together microbiologists and immunologists from different fields to discuss the nature of persistent or latent states in bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens, to identify common themes and pathways of immune evasion to persistent and latent infections. We expect that this session will be of interest to a broad spectrum of researchers interested in host-pathogen interactions. Moreover, the research discussed here will provide a unique opportunity to cross-fertilize findings between diverse fields that have the common goal of understanding how persistent and latent pathogens subvert immunity.


Life Lessons from Biofuels Research and Bioremediation
3:00 p.m.- 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
TYRRELL CONWAY; Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK

Invited Speakers:
LONNIE O. INGRAM; Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Division K Lecturer
PATRICK HALLENBECK; Univ. of Montreal, Montreal, Canada
LISA ALVAREZ-COHEN; Univ. of California - Berkeley, Berkeley, CA

Description:
Significant recent advances in biofuels research and bioremediation, driven by genomics and synthetic biology, are resulting in new ideas and new technologies, fueled by major funding from DOE and venture capital. Amongst the recently developed technologies are genetically engineered microbial production of biofuels from biomass, biomass conversion to hydrogen, and complex mixed microbial communities that interact to catalyze important bioremediation reactions. The potential of these industries for immediate payoff has attracted numerous top scientists and led to establishment of large research consortia. Because the potential speakers are academic basic research scientists, the session will highlight what microbiologists have learned from recent advances in metabolic engineering about the inner workings of microbial biochemistry.


Rewiring Bacterial Metabolism
3:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Convener
JENNIFER L. REED; Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI

Invited Speakers:
COSTAS D. MARANAS; The Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA
BRIAN F. PFLEGER; Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
JEFF A. GRALNICK; Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN

Description:
Microbes are capable of producing a wide variety of natural and non-natural products, including biofuels, biopharmaceuticals and specialty chemicals. This session will include talks on recent computational and experimental advances for rewiring microbial metabolism. Some of the technical challenges that need to be overcome to improve microbial production of chemicals involve improving tolerance to products, introducing and balancing metabolic pathways, increasing uptake and conversion of nutrients, lowering production of undesired by-products and increasing product yields. This session will highlight recent work aimed at tackling these challenges for different microbial systems and attendees will learn how to apply cutting-edge computational and experimental approaches to overcome these challenges


The Roles of Antibiotics in Nature: A Long-Standing Enigma
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
RUSSELL T. HILL; Univ. of Maryland, Ctr. for Environmental Sci., Baltimore, MD

Invited Speakers:
JULIAN E. DAVIES; Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Abbott – ASM Lifetime Achievement Award Lecturer
MARVIN WHITELEY; Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX
RUSSELL T. HILL; Univ. of Maryland Ctr. for Environmental Sci., Baltimore, MD

Description:
The roles of antibiotics in nature remains a mystery more than fifty years after the discovery that bacteria produce antibiotics when grown in rich media to high densities. Production of antibiotics has seldom been detected under natural conditions in the environment. Many antibiotics can result in changes in gene expression at concentrations that are orders of magnitude below those required for antibiosis. One key role for antibiotics in nature is likely to be in cell-cell signaling; this possibility and other potential roles will be discussed.


Transformative Research, and then Some: Mechanisms of Bacterial Lateral Gene Transfer
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
BRIAN K. HAMMER; Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA
DONALD A. MORRISON; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL

Invited Speakers:
DAVID DUBNAU; Univ. of Med. and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ
ROSEMARY J. REDFIELD; The Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
SYLVAIN MOINEAU; Université Laval, Québec City, Canada

Description:
A growing number of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria can transfer and acquire DNA laterally. Since the pioneering work of Griffith in 1928 that led to defining DNA as the “transforming principle," studies continue to reveal novel regulatory signals and genetic systems that control not only transformation, transduction and conjugation, but also more recently described processes including type IV secretion and CRISPR-mediated immunity. DNA acquired laterally often provides the recipient with new metabolic capability or virulence factors, may confer resistance to antibiotics or other extracellular threats, and can play a critical role in shaping the genome of a bacterial recipient. This session will highlight recent advances in uncovering common and unique molecular mechanisms governing DNA uptake and transfer, as well as the impact of these processes in an increasingly broad range of bacteria of environmental and pathogenic importance.


Uncovering the Function of Unknown Proteins
3:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
EDUARDO A. GROISMAN; Yale Univ. Sch. of Med./HHMI, New Haven, CT

Invited Speakers:
GISELA STORZ; NIH, Bethesda, MD
ANTHANASIOS TYPAS; EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany
EDWARD MARCOTTE; Univ. of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX

Description:
A current challenge of the genomic era is to determine the function of the encoded proteins. This is particularly difficult given that a significant fraction of the genes specify peptides or proteins bearing no sequence similarity to proteins of known function. This session will discuss a variety of approaches to uncover the role and/or biochemical activity of novel peptides and proteins. It will also examine the use of sophisticated bioinformatic analysis to deduce protein function in higher organisms based on knowledge acquired with experimentally amenable systems.


Viruses Shaping their Host Environment
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
MICHAEL J. BUCHMEIER; Univ. of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA
LINDA van DYK; Univ. of Colorado Sch. of Med., Denver, CO

Invited Speakers:
LINDSEY HUTT-FLETCHER; Louisiana State Univ. Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Shreveport, LA
Division S Lecturer
LESLIE PARENT; Penn State Coll. of Med., Hershey, PA
Division T Lecturer
LUIS VILLAREAL; Univ. of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA

Description:
The traditional views of virus-host interaction have been redefined by recent studies using the tools of cell biology and genetics. This session will focus in the three plenary talks on three different strategies which have been adopted by viruses to subvert the host cell during infections. The presentations will feature a DNA virus, Epstein-Barr virus which alters it’s entry strategy to suit the specific cell type, B-lymphocyte vs epithelial cell, being attacked. A retroviral model system has been used to dissect molecular mechanisms of virus replication, which in turn led to studies of the intracellular trafficking pathways of retroviral proteins and cellular factors that are recruited to facilitate virus propagation. Finally, at the genetic level, increasing evidence indicates that the human genome has acquired virus derived information. This and other parasitic (retroposon) DNA most differentiates humans from all other species but has historically been dismissed as junk, of little significance to phenotype. More
recently, it has become apparent that most of this intragenic junk is transcribed and may be active as non-coding regulatory RNA. The human brain in particular seems to be subjected to such RNA regulation. Since it is the exogenous viruses (retro and other) that can invade genomes and provoke genome rearrangements, it is time to reevaluate the role they might have played in human evolution.



MONDAY, MAY 20

PLENARY SESSIONS

Bedside to Bench: Microbiology in the Clinics
8:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Conveners:
MICHAEL A. BACHMAN; Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
VICTOR NIZET; Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA

Invited Speakers:
VICTOR NIZET; Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA
SARAH M. FORTUNE; Harvard Sch. of Publ. Hlth., Boston, MA
JEAN-LAURENT CASANOVA; The Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY
MICHAEL A. BACHMAN; Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
ROBERT W. DOMS; Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Description:
Our understanding of microbial pathogenesis has benefitted greatlyfrom the detailed study of well-characterized strains in cell-cultureand animal models of infection. By genetically manipulating thepathogen, microbiologists can determine the microbial factorsrequired to cause disease. However, the wild-type strain in thelaboratory may not represent circulating strains causing diseasein our communities. Conversely, specific immunodeficiencies inpatients may predispose to infections that would not be predictedby studies of a wild-type model host. Careful evaluation of thesymptoms, pathology, and response to therapy in human infectionscan suggest novel and productive research aims. This session willfocus on bedside-to-bench research, starting with observationsin patients and their microbial isolates and leading to mechanisticinsight into pathogenesis. The presentations will describe thevirulence characteristics of pathogens of increasing prevalence andantibiotic resistance, mechanisms by which pathogen heterogeneitycan lead to antimicrobial resistance, and mutations in human factors that predispose to, or protect against, infection.


Microbe-Microbe Interactions
8:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Convener:
MATT PARSEK; Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA

Invited Speakers:
MATT PARSEK; Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA
DAVID LOW; Univ. of California-Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA
DAN WALL; Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY
ERIC CASCALES; LISM – IMM – CNRS; Marseille, France
YVES BRUN; Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN

Description:
This session will cover new aspect of bacterial close-contacts involved in intra and inter-species communication, competition and exchanges affecting the evolution and ecology of bacterial communities in a variety of environments. The session will also educate the audience on the importance of both physical interactions and proximity in controlling cellular behavior.



Microbes in Action! Dynamics of Single Cells to Communities
8:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Developed by the Junior Advisory Group

Conveners:
ELIZABETH K. COSTELLO; Stanford Univ. Sch. of Med., Stanford, CA
ASHLEY SHADE; Yale Univ., New Haven, CT

Invited Speakers:
J. GREGORY CAPORASO; Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ
MARC LIPSITCH; Harvard Sch. of Publ. Hlth., Boston, MA
MARY E. LIDSTROM; Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA
Proctor and Gamble Award in Applied and Environmental Microbiology Lecturer
KATHERINE McMAHON; Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI

Description:
Microorganisms, their communities, their environments, and their interactions change in time. New technologies, such as high-throughput sequencing and high-content screening, allow observation of microbial dynamics at scales previously unattainable. One of the foremost challenges in microbiology is to understand microbial temporal dynamics to the point of prediction, a goal that is within reach. This plenary will explore microbial dynamics across scales from single cells to communities, and will emphasize technologies that provide data-rich context to inform the system’s ecology. We plan to springboard from the topic of ASM 2012 Plenary (“Microbiology in 2012 : The Single Cell Perspective”), to discuss these dynamics and their functional implications. We will feature research that use a range of tools for analyzing and synthesizing temporal datasets, and showcase results from an array of environmental habitats and across a breadth of microbial diversity.



Microbial Nanomachines
8:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Convener:
JUDITH ARMITAGE; Univ. of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
JUN LIU; Univ. of Texas - Houston Med. Sch., Houston, TX

Invited Speakers:
LUCIENNE LETELLIER; Univ. Paris Sud, Orsay Cedex, France
HIROSHI NIKAIDO; Univ. of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
RICHARD EBRIGHT; Waksman Inst., HHMI, Piscataway, NJ
PIET DE BOER; Case Western Reserve Univ. Sch. of Med., Cleveland, OH
Division J Lecturer
JUDITH ARMITAGE; Univ. of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom

Description:
Bacteria are highly ordered organisms using a range of dynamic protein complexes to drive cellular machinery, ensuring they reach the optimal environment for growth, express and translate the correct proteins in the right copy numbers, and in the right places, replicate and segregate their chromosomes at the right times and ensure each daughter inherits a copy. At the same time bacteria are battling to prevent invasion by phage and to remove toxins, while still importing nutrients. The choreography of these processes and the organization of the macromolecular machines involved is becoming increasingly understood as technologies advance. Advances in in vivo single molecule imaging, biophysics and structural approaches mean we can now describe many of the mechanisms driving in great detail and start to develop a vision of the coordinated dynamics of these nanomachines. This session will cover a wide range of cellular processes and highlight the different approaches at the cutting edge of technology taken to understand the ways in which these protein complexes are organized and function. Overall this will provide an overview of bacterial cells as coordinated, ordered organisms.



SYMPOSIA

Discoveries in Symbiosis in the "omics" Age
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
UTE HENTSCHEL HUMEIDA; Univ. of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany

Invited Speakers:
TORSTEN THOMAS; The Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
SPENCER V. NYHOLM; Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
JENNIFER WERNEGREEN; Duke Univ., Durham, NC

Description:
Symbiosis research has seen a revolution in recent years that is powered by next generation sequencing technologies as well as an experimental platform collectively referred to as “omics”. The term “omics” (referring mainly to genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) allowed for many exciting discoveries in symbiosis research, ranging from the recognition to entirely novel metabolic pathways to processes of genome reduction as evolutionary adaptations to a symbiotic lifestyle. Omics technologies have been of huge importance for symbioses research because they are independent of some unresolved issues in the field, such as the resistance of many symbionts to cultivation, the frequent lack of tractable laboratory assays and the inherent difficulties of studying animals from remote environments. With the application of omics, it has become possible to generate sequence data regardless of the environment and type of animal and it thus allows for truly comparative approach. This symposium will focus on recent and exciting discoveries in animal symbioses that were achieved by implementation of “omics” technologies.


Eating Right: How Metabolism Steers Infection
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
SABINE EHRT; Weill Cornell Med. Coll., New York City, NY
JOHN-DEMIAN SAUER; Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
ANAT A. HERSKOVITS; Tel Aviv Univ., Tel Aviv

Invited Speakers:
ANAT HERSKOVITS; Tel Aviv Univ., Tel Aviv, Israel
KYU RHEE; Weill Cornell Med. Coll., New York City, NY
JOSHUA RABINOWITZ; Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ

Description:
As Stanley Falkow often says, "the goal of every bacterium is to become bacteria". This central tenant of biology, the ability to reproduce oneself, is largely governed by nutrient availability and metabolic adaptation. The competition for limited resources drives the evolution of host pathogen interactions, yet understanding the role of metabolic pathways in both the host and the pathogen has often been an overlooked aspect of infectious disease research. In this session we will learn about the role that metabolism has played in shaping the evolution of host pathogen interactions. We will discuss how pathogens utilize the resources available in their unique environments, how this utilization of resources separates pathogens and non-pathogens and how metabolism impacts on pathogenesis. We will also learn about new tools and approaches to probe metabolic function during infections.


Eavesdropping on Microbial Conversations: Deciphering New Meaning from Small Molecule Signaling
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
JOSHUA WOODWARD; Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA

Invited Speakers:
ANGELIKA GRÜNDLING; Imperial Coll. - London, London, United Kingdom
PAULINE SCHAAP; Univ. of Dundee, Dundee, United Kingdom
STEPHEN P. DIGGLE; Univ. of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom

Description:
Small molecules represent a universal and diverse form of communication among living organisms, with ions, nucleotides, and peptides employed in this functional role. Rapid metabolism and diffusion of this class of molecule makes them particularly well suited as intracellular second messengers and extracellular communication signals. In recent years a surge in the discovery and characterization of small molecules with signaling function has uncovered many new surprises with the identification of novel signaling molecules, the use of old signaling molecules in new organisms, and a new appreciation for the consequences of altered signaling in controlling individual and group behavior. This symposium will introduce attendees to the broad field of small molecule signaling and highlight recent findings in the molecular, cellular, and social functions of these signals.


The Great Wall of Bacterial Peptidoglycan and its Impact on the Bug and the Host
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
MIRIAM BRAUNSTEIN; Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC

Invited Speaker:
THOMAS BERNHARDT; Harvard Univ. Med. Sch., Boston, MA
ERIN C. GAYNOR; Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
MARGARET MCFALL-NGAI; Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
EDWARD RUBY; Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

Description:
While the structural composition of peptidoglycan has been known for some time, our understanding of peptidoglycan turnover and remodeling remains incomplete. Peptidoglycan is also more than just a structural component of bacteria. Peptidoglycan fragments can act as signaling molecules that trigger bacterial or host events. Peptidoglycan is also the target of several antibiotics and a better understanding of peptidoglycan biology may help to reveal additional therapeutic options for bacterial pathogens. Recent discoveries about peptidoglycan in a diverse collection of bacteria will be discussed.


It Starts with a Cough: The Many Paths to Pneumonia
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
WYNDHAM W. LATHEM; Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL
STACEY SCHULTZ-CHERRY; St. Jude Children's Res. Hosp., Memphis, TN

Invited Speakers:
RALPH R. ISBERG; Tufts Univ. Sch. of Med., Boston, MA
Division D Lecturer
STACEY SCHULTZ-CHERRY; St. Jude Children's Res. Hosp., Memphis, TN
WILLIAM E. GOLDMAN; Univ. of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

Description:
This symposium will focus on the conserved and diverse mechanisms by which respiratory pathogens are successful in causing disease in the pulmonary compartment. There exist a wide variety of bacteria, viruses, and fungi that are able to cause debilitating, often fatal infections that result primarily from the onset of pneumonia. Among the more well-known pathogens that infect the lungs, influenza (virus), Histoplasma capsulatum (fungus), and Legionella pneumophila (bacterium) are all major causes of morbidity and mortality in humans, but the mechanisms by which they do so are distinct and diverse. In this session, speakers will discuss recent advances in understanding how these and other infectious agents are able to infect and thrive in an otherwise hostile host environment. Specific topics will include both the virulence determinants that respiratory pathogens employ to cause disease and the inflammatory responses to infection, with a discussion of why the host is often not successful in clearing the infection.


Macromolecular Assemblies in Bacteria
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
WILLIAM D. PICKING; Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK

Invited Speakers:
SCOTT J. HULTGREN; Washington Univ. Sch. of Med., St. Louis, MO
Division B Lecturer
LAWRENCE LEE; Victor Chang Cardiac Res. Inst., New South Wales, Australia
ESTHER BULLITT; Boston Univ. Sch. of Med., Boston, MA

Description:
Macromolecular assemblies have evolved to carry out critical bacterial functions including motility, responding to the environment, interacting with surfaces/host cells and delivering cargo to other cells. The complexity of these assemblies also have a tremendous range. This scientific session will introduce different bacterial macromolecular assemblies and the methods used to determine their composition, structure and functions. High resolution imaging techniques, molecular genetics and a variety of biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to provide a level of understanding of these structures that has not existed previously. In particular, the investigators presenting in this session will provide updates on what is known about the assembly, structure and function of surface organelles that have important roles in bacterial responses to environmental conditions and pathogenesis. Emphasis will be on bacterial fimbrial, flagellar and secretion systems.


Metagenomic Approaches in Agriculture and Food Production
3:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
FRANCISCO DIEZ-GONZALEZ; Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN
RYAN C. FINK; Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN

Invited Speakers:
ANDREW BENSON; Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE
BRYAN WHITE; Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL
ANDREA R. OTTESEN; FDA/CFSAN, College Park, MD

Description:
This session covers some of the most promising applications of metagenomics for the purpose of understanding natural bacterial populations in food production and their role in the pre-harvest ecology and food processing. One initial introductory talk will provide a general overview of metagenomics applications at different stages of the food supply. A second presentation will illustrate the complex viral communities in the gastrointestinal tract of cattle with relevance for antibiotic resistance transmission. A third speaker will present a variety of utilization of metagenomic approaches to address issues from the environment associated with fresh produce production to a better understanding on the population dynamics of bacterial enrichments.


Microbiology's Next Top Model: Predicting the Future with Math and Microbes
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
JACK GILBERT; Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Invited Speakers:
SAEED TAVAZOIE; Columbia Univ., New York, NY
CURTIS HUTTENHOWER; Harvard Univ., Boston, MA
JOSHUA LADAU; Univ. of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA

Description:
Microbiology is entering a new age of information. Sequencing techniques are increasing the resolution of investigation for both the taxonomic and functional structure of microbial communities. This improved clarity about how microbes interact with each other, other organisms, and their environment, provides an unprecedented opportunity to create functional and phylogenetic models that can be used to test hypotheses and explore relationships in space and time. Simply put, models are mathematical descriptions of observed patterns in biological dynamics. However, the way in which these dynamics are described can vary significantly, from single cell systems that model molecular dynamics, to host-microbe interaction models that describes how the host responds to changes in the microbiome, to niche models that describe how an individual taxon responds to its environment, and final community models that describe how microbial communities interact and respond to ecosystem change. The 'holy grail' for microbial modelers is being able to combine these different models to transcend the different spatial and temporal scales. This session focuses on these different models and scales, and the advantages and disadvantages of each, to provide the attendee with a broad knowledge base in cutting edge microbiological modeling.


On the Front Lines PMNs, Macrophages and Dendritic Cells
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
IAN J. GLOMSKI; Univ. of Virginia Sch. of Med., Charlottesville, VA

Invited Speaker:
SAMUEL M. BEHAR; Brigham and Women's Hosp., Boston, MA
Division E Lecturer
ALISON CRISS; Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
EDWARD MIAO; Univ. of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

Description:
The innate immune system is the front line of defense against invading pathogens. Innate immune cells including neutrophils, macrophages, and dendritic cells launch chemical attacks and coordinate reinforcements such that in most cases host defenses prevail. However, given the correct circumstances a subset of microbes subverts or even benefits from these defenses to ultimately cause disease and are thus deemed pathogens. This session will focus on the exploration of the finely tuned molecular interactions between innate immune cells and microbial pathogens and how these interactions influence the eventual outcome of these relations,; ranging from the microbe’s perspective to the host’s.


Regulating Gene Expression from the Membrane
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
EDUARDO A. GROISMAN; Yale Univ. Sch. of Med./HHMI, New Haven, CT

Invited Speakers:
EDUARDO A.GROISMAN; Yale Univ. Sch. of Med./HHMI, New Haven, CT
DAVID BOLAM; Univ. of Newcastle, Newcastle, United Kingdom
MARK GOULIAN; Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Description:
This session will explore exciting new findings whereby gene expression is modulated in response to envelope signals, the mechanisms by which integral membrane proteins can transduce information from outside the cytoplasm, and the association of particular regions of the chromosome with the bacterial membrane.


Role of Microbes in Environmental Sustainability
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
ERIN K. LIPP; Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA

Invited Speakers:
JOAN B. ROSE; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI
JAMES MEADOW; Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR
JESSICA GREEN; Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR
MICHAEL J. SADOWSKY; Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN
Division Q Lecturer

Description:
Microorganisms have remained a dominant biological component of our planet for billions of years. As such they have evolved an unmatched metabolic diversity to eke out their existence in nearly any environment. Microbial ecology, therefore, is critical to the understanding of sustainable processes that may provide solutions to a number of the world's growing problems, including clean air, water and energy. This session will explore the role of microbes in a sustainable environment and new research on contributions of microbial ecology to a number of ecosystem services.


This Week in Microbiology
3:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
Vincent Racaniello; Columbia Univ., New York, New York
Moselio Schaechter; San Diego State Univ., San Diego, CA

Invited Speakers:
Ferric Fang; Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA
Moselio Schaechter; San Diego State Univ., San Diego, CA
Additional Guests

Description:
Join hosts Vincent Racaniello and Elio Schaechter for a live recording of the popular science show ‘This Week in Microbioloy’. Guests will include speakers from the General Meeting.



TUESDAY, MAY 21

PLENARY SESSIONS

Environmental Adaptation, Diversity and Reverse Ecology
8:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Conveners:
SCOTT R. MILLER; Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT
RACHEL J. WHITAKER; Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL

Invited Speakers:
MARTIN F. POLZ; Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA
Eli Lilly and Company - Elanco Research Award Lecturer
JOHN TAYLOR; Univ. of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
SCOTT R. MILLER; Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT
ELODIE GHEDIN; Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
DUSTIN BRISSON; Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Description:
Elucidating the biotic and abiotic factors that shape the diversity of natural populations is a central goal of microbial ecology and evolution with implications spanning the spectrum from environmental to medical microbiology. In this session, we introduce how population genomics approaches are transforming our understanding of these factors by enabling the identification of the adaptive genetic differences among microorganisms, even without prior information regarding the relevant ecological traits. The session will highlight recent studies which reveal genetic changes that contribute to the functionally important diversity and the evolutionary potential of viruses, bacteria and eukaryotic microorganisms.


The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: Food Microbiology in the Omics Age
8:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Conveners:
GREGORY R. SIRAGUSA; DuPont, Waukesha, WI
EDWARD G. DUDLEY; Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA

Invited Speakers:
THADDEUS B. STANTON; Natl. Animal Disease Res. Ctr., Ames, IA
Division Z Lecturer
LEE-ANN JAYKUS; North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC
Division P Lecturer
BART C. WEIMER; Univ. of California-Davis, Davis, CA
MARTIN WIEDMANN; Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY
JAMES L. STEELE; Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI

Description:
Food microbiology and Animal Health microbiology are undergoing revolutionary basic changes due to the advent of pyrosequencing and user-friendly bioinformatic analytical software, i.e. metagenomics. In addition, genomics, proteomics, metagenomics and transcriptomics will begin to open the doors to our understanding the populations of microorganisms we study in food and the gut environs. This session will provide both new knowledge and serve as an update on the core organisms of food production from farm-to-fork. Will include the “good” in dairy organisms and beneficial gut bacteria; the “bad” and the “ugly” in pathogens including Listeria and Noroviruses. Along with this subject matter is an outlaying of perhaps the most ambitious food microbiology and epidemiological study yet undertaken; i.e., the full genome sequencing of 100,000 different foodborne pathogens. Attendees will come away with knowledge in the areas of gut microbial ecology and antibiotic resistance in food animals, foodborne viruses, in-depth genomics of dairy starter cultures and the psychotrophic foodborne pathogen Listeria; and finally knowledge of an application of high throughput pyrosequencing and strain comparison across entire genomes.


Microbial Transmission: Getting from Here to There
8:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Convener:
TOD J. MERKEL; FDA, CBER; Bethesda, MD

Invited Speakers:
JULIAN PARKHILL; The Sanger Inst.; Cambridge, United Kingdom
Division R Lecturer
ANDREW CAMILLI; Tufts Univ., Boston, MA
TOD J. MERKEL; FDA, CBER; Bethesda, MD
PATRICIA ROSA; NIAID, Hamilton, MT
CHERIE BRIGGS; Univ. of California-Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA

Description:
The ultimate goal of a successful microbial pathogen is stable transmission to new hosts in order to ensure the propagation of future generations. Understandably, a tremendous amount of resources and attention is spent on understanding the pathogenesis of infectious microbes within the host, however; transmission between hosts is an equally important phase of the infectious life cycle. This session will illustrate different strategies employed by microbes to unsure their survival outside of the host and maximize their transmission to new hosts.



The Rising Appreciation of Post-transcriptional Regulation of Gene Expression in the Microbial World
8:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Convener:
JEFFREY WILUSZ; Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO

Invited Speakers:
TINA M. HENKIN; The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH
JOSEPH PUGLISI; Stanford Univ. Sch. of Med., Stanford, CA
SIDNEY R. KUSHNER; Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA
Division H Lecturer
ROY PARKER; Univ. of Colorado-Boulder, Boulder, CO
JEFFREY WILUSZ; Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO

Description:
Recent advances in RNA biology have demonstrated that there is a lot more to the regulation of gene expression than the simple DNA→RNA→Protein central dogma. The overall goal of this session is to provide attendees with a better understanding of the impact of post-transcriptional processes on microbial and host cell processes. Attendees will gain an appreciation for how RNA molecules can sense metabolites and signal changes in gene expression. They will learn a great deal about the inner workings of the ribosome and the regulation of translation by applications of cutting-edge single molecule technologies. Finally, they will understand how regulated RNA stability impacts gene expression from both prokaryotic and eukaryotic perspectives. Collectively, this session should allow attendees to think more broadly about the regulation of gene expression and influence them to include RNA biology as a possible mechanism that can contribute to a variety of phenomenon in microbiology.



SPECIAL INTEREST SESSIONS

The Immune Response and Diseases Which Primarily Affect Underrepresented Populations
11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Developed by the Public and Scientific Affairs Board Committee on Microbiological Issues Impacting Minorities

Conveners:
BERENEICE M. MADISON; Battelle Mem. Inst., Atlanta, GA
DWAYNE BOUCAUD; Quinnipiac Univ., Hamden, CT

Invited Speakers:
JUDITH A. JAMES; Oklahoma Med. Res. Fndn., Oklahoma City, OK
MICHAEL R. BETTS; Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
JOEL D. ERNST; New York Univ. Sch. of Med., New York, NY
WAYNE DUFFUS; Ctrs. for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA

Description:
The role of the immune system is to defend the body against foreign invaders. In the absence of a properly functioning immune system, the host is subject to a variety of immunological diseases and dysfunctions. Studies demonstrate that these diseases and dysfunctions disproportionately impact certain groups and in impacting these groups represent one of the health topics included in health disparities. Health disparities refers to differences in the presence and severity of disease, health outcomes and quality of health care that exists in particular racial or ethnic groups, low income and medically underserved populations. There are multiple elements which contribute to these group specific outcomes including, but not limited to, access to quality health care, community-based factors and biology. Accordingly, a defective immune system can lead to faulty immune responses which, in turn, cause a host of immune response diseases. These include both infectious and non-infectious diseases, such as acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), tuberculosis, diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus. In many of these diseases the immune system plays a key role in not just defending against the disease but contributing to the disease process. Understanding the immune response in these and other such diseases is an important step in effectively developing translational tools to effectively address health disparities among racial and ethnic minorities and underserved populations.



Implementing a Multidisciplinary Team Approach in Managing MDROs: Complementary Roles of Microbiology and Infection Control
11:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Developed by the Professional Practice Committee

Conveners:
LANCE R. PETERSON; NorthShore Univ. HealthSystem, Evanston, IL
MARC-OLIVER WRIGHT; NorthShore Univ. HealthSystem, Evanston, IL

Invited Speakers:
BRIAN S. KOLL; Beth Israel Med. Ctr., New York, NY
KATHY AUREDEN; Sherman Hosp., Elgin, IL
MARC-OLIVER WRIGHT; NorthShore Univ. HealthSystem, Evanston, IL
LANCE R. PETERSON; NorthShore Univ. HealthSystem, Evanston, IL

Description:
This symposium highlights the re-awakening role of active integration between the Clinical Microbiology laboratory and Infection Control. Improving healthcare outcomes and reducing patient risk is increasingly important as national priorities and a synergistic partnership between the laboratory and infection control is critical for this success. The importance is recognized at the highest level of leadership in hospitals, and this symposium will highlight that recognition. We will also provide practical examples of how this close relationship can successfully operate, as well as demonstrate the potential of infection control as a career path for interested microbiology medical technologists. Microbiology should not be a passive partner in this relationship, but rather provide novel approaches to solving infection control problems, ranging from developing special culture (surveillance) media, to providing ready reports of pathogen trends, to introducing appropriate rapid diagnostic testing for critical diseases and pathogens.



Men, Women, Infection, and Infertility
11:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Developed by the Public and Scientific Affairs Board Committee on the Status of Women in Microbiology

Conveners:
LORRAINE A. FINDLAY; Nassau County Comm. Coll. and Med. Ctr., Garden City, NY
ANNE-MARIE B. BLANCQUAERT; Dow Corning Corp., Carrollton, KY

Invited Speakers:
NORVAL STRACHAN; Univ. of Aberdeen, Scotland, Aberdeen, United Kingdom
SABRA L. KLEIN; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch. of Publ. Health, Baltimore, MD
MARCUS ALTFELD; Ragon Inst. of Massachusetts Gen. Hosp., MIT and Harvard, Charlestown, MA
ALAN H. DECHERNEY; NIH, Bethesda, MD
MARIAN MCDONALD; Ctrs. for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA

Description:
This session examines the impact of infectious disease on fertility and infertility in both genders, and discusses the global consequences of these infections in terms of worldwide mental and physical health. The session further explores gender similarities and differences, including the influences of hormones, with respect to infection and immunity. Issues of behavioral responses with respect to infectious disease and the effects of infectious disease on pregnancy are also discussed.


Strategic Coalitions and Public Policy in Human Health and Disease
11:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Developed by the Public and Scientific Affairs Board Professional Affairs Committee

Conveners:
VICKIE S. BASELSKI; Univ. of Tennessee Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Memphis, TN
ALICE S. WEISSFELD; Microbiol. Specialists Inc., Houston, TX

Invited Speakers:
VICKIE S. BASELSKI; Univ. of Tennessee Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Memphis, TN
VINCE STINE; Amer. Assn. for Clinical Chemistry, Washington, DC
ELISSA PASSIMENT; ASCLS, Washington, DC
ROBYN M. ATKINSON-DUNN; Unified State Labs, Taylorsville, UT
MELVIN P. WEINSTEIN; Univ. of Med. and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ

Description:
Underlying ASM’s dedication to the advancement of the microbiological sciences is a strong commitment that science serves the public interest, including in the important area of healthcare delivery. To meet this objective, ASM works with a number of government agencies and other scientific organizations to insure delivery of patient-centered services. This session will provide an overview of ongoing projects in which PSAB committees partner with federal agencies such as the FDA, CMS, and CDC, and with coalitions of laboratory organizations to improve human health by facilitating diagnosis and prevention of infectious diseases.



SYMPOSIA

Biofilms
3:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
FITNAT YILDIZ; Univ. of California-Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA

Invited Speakers:
FITNAT YILDIZ; Univ. of California-Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA
AARON MITCHELL; Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA
Division X Lecturer
GUROL SUEL; Univ. of California-San Diego, San Diego, CA

Description:

The study of microbial biofilm now pervades and impacts many scientific disciplines and constitutes an exciting multidisciplinary research field. This session will focus on molecular and biophysical aspects of biofilm-associated processes in bacteria and fungi, ranging from formation and regulation to physiology and pathogenesis.


The Ecology of Clostridium difficile Infections
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
RITA TAMAYO; Univ. of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
VINCENT B. YOUNG; Univ. of Michigan Med. Sch., Ann Arbor, MI

Invited Speakers:
VINCENT B. YOUNG; Univ. of Michigan Med. Sch., Ann Arbor, MI
SHONNA M. MCBRIDE; Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA
TOR SAVIDGE; Baylor Coll. of Med., Houston, TX

Description:
Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is one of the most prevalent nosocomial infections resulting in over $4B in excess healthcare costs annually. The pathogenesis of CDI reflects complex interactions between the pathogen, the indigenous gut microbiota and the host. During colonization of the gastrointestinal tract, C. difficile must overcome the host innate immune system and the indigenous intestinal microbiota, which mediate colonization resistance against C. difficile. Once colonization is established, the development of clinical disease symptoms is mediated through the activities of toxins produced by the bacterium. This symposium highlights recent research that reveals some of the ways C. difficile, the host, and the microbiota interact with each other and how these interactions influence the outcome of the infection.


Evolution of Bioenergetic Systems
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
MARTIN G. KLOTZ; Univ. of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC
DONALD A. BRYANT; The Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA

Invited Speakers:
DONALD A. BRYANT; The Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA
MARC STROUS; Max Planck Inst. for Marine Microbiol., Bremen, Germany
MARTIN G. KLOTZ; Univ. of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC

Description:
Recent significant technological developments have provided for the discovery of new metabolic modules and thus opportunities for synthesis and insight. In particular, recently obtained information on catabolic modules (providing for energy transformation and conservation) and their function and evolution, revealed that most of their components belong to a limited collection of protein super families and that their function in extant microorganisms is the outcome of "mix and match" across boundaries that we usually define by the elemental nature of electron donors and acceptors that participate in global biogeochemical redox cycles (i.e., the S, N, C, Fe cycles). New technological developments are also challenging current views on these cycles and show unexpected levels of competition and cross feeding in microbial communities. Changing environmental conditions over evolutionary times have contributed to outcomes that are strikingly suboptimal regarding the overall metabolism, at least from a bioenergetic perspective, which are hidden under a neutral blanket of complexity. The session is designed to provide synthesis of basic principles for both chemo- and phototrophic catabolism.


Extraordinary and Extreme Microbial Lifestyles
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.| Video from the Convener

Convener:
AMY C. VOLLMER; Swarthmore Coll., Swarthmore, PA

Invited Speakers:
MIKAEL ELIAS; Weizmann Inst. of Sci., Rehovot, Israel
JOHN LEIGH; Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA
ALISON E. MURRAY; Desert Res. Inst., Reno, NV
MICHAEL DALY; Uniformed Services Univ. Sch. of Med., Bethesda, MD

Description:
When studying such specialized and unusual organisms, investigators must think 'outside of the box' in designing their experiments as well as in the methods they employ in their work. Such findings give the audience a better idea of the diversity of conditions on the planet and stimulate thought about how life arose and other planets where it might be found. Since most students become acquainted with microbiology through courses that introduce more 'typical' bacteria, this session should expand their horizons. More experienced investigators tend to specialize in one or a few niches; presentations at this session will likely increase their understanding of various and diverse environments.


Fermented Foods and Beverages: A Flavorful Blend of Culinary Tradition and Microbial Terroir
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
DAVID MILLS; Univ. of California-Davis, Davis, CA

Invited Speakers:
DAVID MILLS; Univ. of California-Davis, Davis, CA
LUC DE VUYST; Vrije Universiteit Brussels, Brussels, Belgium
JEAN-PIERRE GUYOT; Inst. de Recherche pour le Développement, Montpellier, France

Description:
Culinary traditions around the world have produced in a diverse array of fermented foods and beverages that represent a significant portion of the human diet. The new tools of modern biology have rapidly advanced our understanding of these complex food fermentations. New microbial ecology approaches are providing insight into the biogeography and complex microbial interactions of a diverse array of fermented products such as chocolate, cheese, coffee, wine, beer and kimchi. This symposium will seek to provide a "new look" at age-old fermentations and provide a real world examples of how fermentation can convert otherwise inedible (and sometimes toxic) foodstuffs into valuable components of diets around the world.


A Light Guide to Microbial Photobiology: From Physiology to Synthetic Biology
3:00:00 PM - 5:30:00 PM

Convener:
MARK GOMELSKY; Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY

Invited Speakers:
JENNIFER LOROS; The Audrey and Theodor Geisel Sch. of Med. at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH.
NATHAN C. ROCKWELL; Univ. of California-Davis, Davis, CA
JEFFREY J. TABOR; Rice Univ., Houston, TX

Description:
Can microbes see light and why would they need to “see”? Why do we need to know about microbial responses to light? Until recently, responses to light environment were believed to be limited to the photosynthetic microbes. This view was overturned by the realization that > 25% of all sequenced bacterial, archael and lower eukaryotic genomes encode photoreceptor proteins. In addition to regulating photosynthesis and production of photoprotective pigments, light has been shown to regulate circadian rhythms and phototaxis, as well as transition between the motile, single-cellular state and the surface-attached multicellular state, biofilm formation and virulence. This session will expose diverse biological responses triggered by photoreceptors of bacteria, archaea and lower eukaryotes and discuss molecular mechanisms involved in light sensing and signal transduction. It will emphasize unique properties of light as a trigger of biological responses that can be used to control various processes with high spatiotemporal resolution, unachievable by chemical or genetic manipulations. The optogenetic and synthetic biology approaches involving microbial photoreceptors opened unprecedented opportunities for biomedical and biotechnological applications.


Microbial Ecosystems: From Networks to Models
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener
JEROEN RAES; VIB, Brussels, Belgium

Invited speakers:
JEROEN RAES; VIB, Brussels, Belgium
TIM BARRACLOUGH; Imperial Coll. London, London, United Kingdom
ELHANAN BORENSTEIN; Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA

Description:
Microbial ecosystems are structured by a wide range of competitive and cooperative interactions between its inhabitants. Co-occurrence and correlation patterns extracted from metagenomics and 16S pyrosequencing datasets are increasingly used for the prediction of species interactions in environments ranging from the oceans to the human microbiome. In addition, parallelized co-culture assays and combinatorial labelling experiments allow high-throughput discovery of ecological relationships between species. These techniques are opening the way towards global ecosystem network prediction and the development of ecosystem-wide dynamic models. In this session, we will explore various approaches to species interaction inference and prediction, discuss their strengths and weaknesses, and show their applications in a wide range of ecosystems. In addition, we will cover examples of systems biology and modelling approaches that can help understanding the metabolic basis of collaborative and competitive relationships (e.g. in the human gut) and investigate the role of species interactions in the evolution of adaptive traits.


New Frontiers in Synthetic Biology: Challenges and Opportunities
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
ELHANAN BORENSTEIN; Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA
ERIC KLAVINS; Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA

Invited Speakers:
JOHN GLASS; J. Craig Venter Inst., Rockville, MD
Division G Lecturer
ERIC KLAVINS; Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA
RON WEISS; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA

Description:
Recent advances in sequencing technologies, molecular biology methods, and computational analyses are now paving the road to a myriad of exciting new developments in synthetic biology. Specifically, our enhanced ability to model, measure, and manipulate complex biological systems is giving rise to novel approaches for designing, constructing, validating and refining synthetic biological devices on a scale never before imagined. Engineering efforts can now target multiple organizational levels, from simple molecules to whole communities. This session will focus on new frontiers in synthetic biology enabled by such new technologies, as well as on the potential applications and opportunities embodied by these novel approaches and the challenges lying ahead.


New Insights into the Regulation of Translation
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
PETER J. MYLER; Seattle Biomedical Res. Inst., Seattle, WA
PAUL BABITZKE; The Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA

Invited Speakers:
IRINA ARTSIMOVITCH; The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH
ERIC MASSE; Univ. de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Canada
PETER J. MYLER; Seattle Biomedical Res. Inst., Seattle, WA

Description:
Translational control is rapidly gaining recognition as being critical in the pathogenesis of bacterial, protozoal, fungal, and viral pathogens, as well as controlling gene expression in other microbes. Recent advances in technology and our understanding of the processes involved in translation suggest that diverse organisms share a variety of molecular mechanisms that regulate the rate at which mRNAs are translated over time and in response to different environmental conditions. By bringing together experts in translational control from a variety of different fields, this session will provide an overview of approaches available for elucidating the plethora of mechanisms microbes employ to regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level.


Organizing, Replicating and Segregating the Genome
3:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
STEPHEN D. BELL; Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN

Invited Speakers:
STEPHEN D. BELL; Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN
RODRIGO REYES LAMOTHE; McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec, Canada
MARIA SCHUMACHER; Duke Univ., Durham, NC

Description:
The last few years have seen dramatic advances in our understanding of both the mechanisms and the organization of DNA replication in prokaryotic cells. In particular, structural biology has revealed the architecture of replication protein assemblies and advances in prokaryotic cell biology have led to much greater appreciation of the organization of the nucleoid and the interface between functional organization and the spatial control of replication. This session will bring together experts in biochemistry, structural biology and cell biology to illustrate the dramatic pace of research in this field.


Phylogenomics and Microbial Species Concepts
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Conveners:
HOLLY BIK; Univ. of California-Davis, Davis, CA
MEGHAN A. MAY; Towson Univ., Towson, MD

Invited Speakers:
FREDERICK A. MATSEN IV; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Res. Ctr., Seattle, WA
RAMON ROSSELLÓ-MÓRA; Mediterranean Inst. for Advc. Studies - IMEDEA (CSIC-UIB), Esporles, Spain
KONSTANTINOS T. KONSTANTINIDIS; Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA

Description
Phylogenomic studies merge phylogenetic and genomic approaches in order to investigate ecological and evolutionary patterns. In addition to phylogeny-driven computational tools, phylogenomic research foci may encompass themes such as functional profiling and the evolution of function, microbial community ecology and evolution, co-evolution and host/parasite relationships, or comparative genomics and genomic variation (e.g 'core genome' and 'pan-genome' concepts). How do we make sense of such large, disparate datasets, and merge this knowledge to further our understanding of microbial species concepts? This session will bring together a diverse set of speakers harnessing phylogenomic approaches, from computational biology to community ecology.


When Microbes Target the Nucleus
3:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Convener:
HÉLÈNE BIERNE; INRA - Pasteur Inst., Paris, France

Invited Speakers:
ULLA BONAS; Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany
HÉLÈNE BIERNE; INRA - Inst. Pasteur, Paris, France
MASAHIRO FUJISHIMA; Yamaguchi Univ., Yamaguchi, Japan

Description:
The eukaryotic nucleus was long considered to be 'safe' from attack by pathogenic bacteria. This session will highlight recent research by pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria that can deliver molecules called 'nucleomodulins' to the nucleus of plants and animals, or in some cases even invade the nucleus. Attendees will learn about intranuclear bacteria, and bacterial effectors that hijack host nuclear processes by interfering with transcription, chromatin-remodeling, RNA splicing or DNA replication and repair. The research presented in this session will show how the study of nucleomodulins and endonuclear bacteria can generate new insights into long-term impacts of infectious diseases and create novel tools for biotechnological applications and for deciphering the regulation of nuclear dynamics. We encourage provocative discussions on how bacteria can mediate imprints on host cells and have long-term genetic and epigenetic effects.

18 May - 21 May 2013
Denver
United States of America
meeting website