Netherlands Annual Ecology Meeting 2012

he Netherlands Annual Ecology Meeting is a two-day event organised by NERN and NECOV (Dutch - Flemish Ecological Society) and supported by The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).
+ show speakers and program
08:30
Registration and coffee in the Lounge and setting up posters

Europe Hall
10:15
Word of Welcome
· Louise Vet (Chair NERN, Director Netherlands Institute of Ecology)
· Jaap van der Meer (Chair organising committee, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research)

Plenary 1: " The reciprocity of ecological and evolutionary dynamics "
Highlight:
It is increasingly recognized that ecological and evolutionary dynamics often take place over similar spatial and temporal scales, and may thus interact with each other. This interplay leads to novel and interesting complexities in the way populations, communities and ecosystems respond to environmental gradients and to environmental change. In this keynote session, eco-evolutionary dynamics are examined from different viewpoints, emphasizing conceptual issues and also illustrating different approaches using empirical examples. The session will critically address the circumstances under which evolution is and is not expected to influence ecological dynamics, and it will highlight perspectives and challenges for future research.
10:30
1. Andrew Hendry (McGill University, Montréal, Canada)

"Eco-evolutionary dynamics: a conceptual framework."
The speed of evolution has traditionally been considered too slow to materially impact ecological dynamics playing out in contemporary time. I will first review evidence that challenges this assumption through studies documenting rapid evolutionary change in organisms experiencing altered environments. Many of the observed changes are in phenotypic traits that strongly interact with aspects of the environment, including other species. Rapid evolution is therefore expected to have ecological consequences and the population, community, and ecosystem levels. I will outline a conceptual framework for these eco-evolutionary dynamics and illustrate its components through a series of empirical examples from diverse natural systems. Among the various influences, I will pay particular attention to the role of population dynamics in responding to evolutionary change and in then having community and ecosystem consequences. I will then generate a set of predictions for when evolution will and will not have important influences on ecological dynamics. I will close with a discussion of outstanding questions in this emerging synthetic field of investigation – some of which will lead directly into the following talk by Luc De Meester.
11.15
2. Luc de Meester (Leuven)
“Evolving metacommunities: a race between adaptation and immigration”
Ecological and evolutionary processes have largely been studied separately, yet there is growing evidence that ecological and evolutionary dynamics can occur at the same time scale and can strongly interact. Ignoring these interactions may distort our view of population, community and ecosystem responses to environmental change, including human impact. The evolving metacommunities framework tries to disentangle the relative importance of species and genotype sorting in determining community trait responses to environmental gradients locally and regionally. A key aspect that determines the outcome of eco-evolutionary interactions is the rate of local species sorting and genetic adaptation versus immigration rates. I will illustrate these concepts amongst others with our own research, using the water flea and its responses to natural and anthropogenic stressors as main model system. I will discuss evolution-mediated priority effects and responses to climate change, and I will try to sketch an integrated approach that integrates widely different approaches ranging from field based community research to eco- and paleogenomics.
12:00
Lunch in the restaurant
Location
Europe Hall
America Hall
Asia Hall
Africa Hall
13:30
Parallel 1a:
Biodiversity and Conservation
Parallel 1b:
Experimental evolution
Parallel 1c:
Plant Eco-physiology – special focus: Intraspecific variation of plant traits
Parallel 1d:
Behavioural Ecology: Individual variation in animal behaviour

Highlight:
Biodiversity and conservation research is rapidly moving from a descriptive towards a predictive science. Current research aims to understand the mechanisms underlying species-environment relationships.

In this session we aim to explore new insights into the drivers of biodiversity and its decline, as well as new insights on how to restore and conserve functioning ecosystems. We especially welcome talks on novel approaches and techniques that help us understand the basic principles of biodiversity and its conservation.
Highlight:
Experimental evolution involves the direct observation of evolving populations to study fundamental evolutionary questions in real-time. This approach has been successfully applied to a wide range of organisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, plants, animals, and even to single enzymes. This session aims to highlight the wide diversity of uses of experimental evolution for answering both ecological and evolutionary questions, and how next-generation techniques can be applied to study the genetic basis of evolution in detail.
Highlight:
Traits enabling plants to respond to their a-biotic and biotic environment not only vary between plant species, but also within species. Within-species variation mainly results from different selection pressures and adaptation of populations to local conditions. This session invites researchers to present their latest findings on how intraspecific variation of plant traits evolves, and how it contributes to local adaptation and microevolution.
Highlight:
Individual-based studies form the basis for research on how organisms interact with the environment and with each other. In this, variation in behaviour is a key aspect of animal behaviour, and a noteworthy variation in behaviour exists within as well as between individuals. In this session we explore this variation in behaviour. What are the proximate and ultimate causes for variation in behaviour? And what are the consequences of variation for, for example, foraging success, survival and reproduction, and population change? Understanding of causes and consequences of variation in behaviour is key for our understanding of animal ecology.

Conveners:
1. Roel van Klink (University of Groningen)
(r.van.klink@rug.nl)
2. Toos van Noordwijk (Radboud University Nijmegen) (t.vannoordwijk@science.ru.nl)
Conveners:
1. Bart Pannebakker (University of Groningen)
(B.A.Pannebakker@rug.nl)
2. Arjan de Visser (WUR) (Arjan.deVisser@wur.nl)
Conveners:
1. Eric Visser (Radboud University Nijmegen) (eric.visser@science.ru.nl)
2. Phlippine Vergeer (Radboud University Nijmegen)
(p.vergeer@science.ru.nl)
Conveners:
1. Kees van Oers ( Netherlands Institute of Ecology)
(k.vanoers@nioo.knaw.nl)
2. Raymond Klaassen (Werkgroep Grauwe Kiekendief / University of Groningen)
(raymond.klaassen2@gmail.com)
13:30




13:50




14:10




14:30
Break
14:40




15:00




15:20




15:40
Coffee and tea in the lounge
Location
Europe Hall
America Hall
Asia Hall
Africa Hall
16:00
Parallel 2a:
Adaptation of migratory organisms in a changing world
Parallel 2b:
Genomics of Adaptation & Species interactions
Parallel 2c:
Phenotypic Plasticity
Parallel 2d:
The ecology of artificial habitats

Highlight:
Many organisms migrate between areas to optimally utilize habitat seasonality during their annual cycle. Migration can be a fitness optimizing strategy, but also entails costs associated with the act of migration itself and/or with the environments experienced during different annual cycle stages, such as predation, food availability and diseases. This is even more so, when unprecedented environmental change is experienced. In this symposium we want to focus on adaptation of migratory organisms in the light of their often globe-spanning and changing environments.
Highlight:
A significant part of the genome is shaped by ecological interactions, both with other species and by the spatio-temporal variation in local conditions. Local adaptations can leave a clear signature in the genome, and may ultimately lead to speciation. Using genomic technologies we are starting to unravel the contributions of ecological interactions on genome evolution. In this session we want to explore the current understanding of the genetic processes of adaptation and evolution
Highlight:
In heterogeneous environments, organisms need to evolve the ability to adapt to environmental changes. Phenotypic plasticity is suggested to have a prominent role in responding to rapid changes (e.g. climate change). However, we know little about the ecological conditions that favour selection on plasticity. In this session we aim to bring together recent insights in understanding the role of plasticity in adapting to environmental changes with a focus on the consequences at the ecosystem level.
Highlight:
The ecological importance and need for conservation of artificial habitats is still subject of debate. Are shipwrecks in the North Sea human waste on the seabed? Or are they hotspots for biodiversity and valuable habitats that urgently need conservation? On land many examples exist where artificial habitats are considered valuable and are protected by law: The IJsselmeer, bat colonies in military bunkers and Dutch heathlands are good examples of protected man-made habitats. In this session, examples of ecologically valuable artificial habitats are demonstrated and the need for conservation will be discussed.

Conveners:
1. Christiaan Both (University of Groningen)
(c.both@rug.nl)
2. Jeroen Reneerkens (University of Groningen)
(j.w.h.reneerkens@rug.nl)
3. Janne Ouwehand (University of Groningen)
(janneouwehand@gmail.com)
Conveners:
1. Bregje Wertheim (University of Groningen)
(b.wertheim@rug.nl)
2. Louis van de Zande (University of Groningen)
(louis.van.de.zande@rug.nl)
3. Ken Kraaijeveld (Leiden Genome Technology Center)
(ken@kenkraaijeveld.nl)
Conveners:
1. Silvia Paolucci (University of Groningen)
(s.paolucci@rug.nl)
2. Lucia Salis (Netherlands Institute of Ecology)
(l.salis@nioo.knaw.nl)
Conveners:
1. Wouter Lengkeek (Bureau Waardenburg)
(w.lengkeek@buwa.nl)
2. Joop Coolen (Stichting de Noordzee) (j.coolen@noordzee.nl)
16:00




16:20




16:40




17:00
Break
17:10




17:30




17:50




18:10
Drinks in the Lounge and from 18:30 onwards dinner in the restaurant
19:30
Poster sessions / Coffee

Europe Hall
21:00
Evening Programme:
Nature in the Netherlands (Frank Berendse, Wageningen University)


Wednesday 8 February
07:30
Breakfast in the restaurant
08:00
Registration for those coming on Day 2 only
Location
Europe Hall
America Hall
Asia Hall
Africa Hall
8:30
Parallel 3a:
Aquatic ecology: dynamics and feedbacks and consequences for ecosystem management
Parallel 3b:
Ecotoxicology and ecosystem functioning: impacts of chemicals related to ecological traits
Parallel 3c:
Plant-Insect Interactions
Parallel 3d:
Advanced statistical methods for Ecology

Highlight:
We would like to give a state-of-the-art overview of innovative applications of knowledge obtained in fundamental aquatic ecological research. How can the lessons learned from fundamental science contribute to more effective nature conservation and ecosystem management? We focus on four research themes which have been subject to intensive study: (1) The role of dispersal in connecting aquatic systems at the landscape scale, (2) The biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationship, (3) Causes and implications of regime shifts, and (4) Interactions between ecosystem drivers.
Highlight:
Given the large diversity of species, ecosystems, the dynamics of environmental conditions and mixtures of chemicals, the assessment of effects of chemicals in the outside world is problematic. In this session we explore new biological grounded tools to assess the impacts of chemicals on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. The focus will be on: molecular technics, eco-physiological modelling and trait-based approaches.
Highlight:
Plants and insects are involved in a wide range of symbiotic and antagonistic interactions such as pollination, seed dispersal, herbivory and the attraction of natural enemies of the herbivores. In this session we will explore the mechanisms and drivers which influence the complex direct and indirect relations between plants and insects.
Highlight:
The move towards a quantitative and predictive ecology requires appropriate statistics. In this session we explore the benefits of advanced statistical methods in ecological research. We welcome contributions that not only focus on ecological research but also explain how advanced statistical methods help to analyse and interpret the data in a way that conventional methods cannot. For instance methods that can account for hierarchically structured data, heterogeneous response variables, phylogeny or causality.

Conveners:
1. Lisette N. de Senerpont Domis (Netherlands Institute of Ecology) (L.deSenerpontDomis@nioo.knaw.nl)
2. Steven DeClerck (Netherlands Institute of Ecology) (S.Declerck@nioo.knaw.nl)
Conveners:
1. Geert de Snoo (Leiden University)
(snoo@cml.leidenuniv.nl)
2. Willie Peijenenburg (Leiden University)
(Willie.Peijnenburg@rivm.nl)
Conveners:
1. Maaike Bruinsma, (Leiden University) (m.bruinsma@biology.leidenuniv.nl )
2. Luisa Carvalheiro (University of Leeds, NCB-Naturalis) (l.g.carvalheiro@leeds.ac.uk)
Conveners:
1. Bob Douma (VU University Amsterdam)
(j.c.douma@vu.nl)
2. Eelke Jongejans (Radboud University Nijmegen) (E.jongejans@science.ru.nl)
8:30




8:50




9:10




9:30
Break
9:40




10:00




10:20




10:40
Coffee and tea in the lounge

Europe Hall

Plenary 2: “Ecological interactions on different scales: can we meet in the middle?"
Highlight:
Ecological interactions on different scales: Can we meet in the middle?
Ecology by nature is a broad scientific discipline, involving scientists studying interactions between organisms on widely diverse scales. Both large scale analyses and small scale studies have their own values, but only seldom they are combined. The question we would like to address in our back-to-back presentations is whether and how we can apply a large scale approach, such as interaction network analyses, to a small scale study on individual interactions between a plant species and its herbivores or mutualists.
11:00
1. José M. Gómez (Universidad de Granada)
Dr. José María Gómez is full professor in Evolutionary Ecology at the University of Granada, Spain. His research focuses deals with the ecology and evolution of plant-animal interactions in multispecies systems. He is mostly interested in understanding how ecological interactions may shape phenotypic evolution, and how organisms can evolve in generalist scenarios. To answer this question, his lab works both at micro and macroevolutionary scales, using contrasting approaches (field experiments and observations, genetic analyses, numerical simulations and modeling, etc.).
11.45
2. Nicole van Dam (Radboud University Nijmegen)
Dr. Nicole M. van Dam is full professor in Ecogenomics at Radboud University Nijmegen. The research in her department focuses on herbivore-induced plant responses and interactions between biotic-abiotic stress responses. The people in her department analyze these responses on the transcriptomic, metabolomic as well as ecological level. By merging these different approaches and scales, the aim is to gain a full understanding of adaptive plant stress responses in complex and changing natural environments.
12:30
Lunch in the restaurant
13:30
Poster Session Day 2 / Coffee
Location
Europe Hall
America Hall
Asia Hall
Africa Hall
15:00
Parallel 4a:
Marine Ecology
Parallel 4b:
Disease Ecology
Parallel 4c:
Establishment in a new environment
Parallel 4d:
Microbial Ecology and Systems Biology: Questions and Methods

Highlight:
Marine waters cover 70% of the earth yet marine ecology is usually underrepresented at general ecology conferences. This session will give a home to those working on marine populations, communities or ecosystems and aims to illustrate how marine ecology research contributes to general ecological theory.
Highlight:
Understanding the causal factors that influence the spatio-temporal patterns of disease outbreak is an exciting new research field in spatial sciences, ecology and veterinary sciences. These outbreaks are not only determined by the presence of hosts and vectors, but also by ecological factors such as community composition or habitat fragmentation, epidemiological factors such as immunity, and climatic factors such as temperature. In this session we welcome theoretical and empirical studies to better understand disease outbreaks
Highlight:
In order to colonize a new habitat patch, plant and animal species have to overcome a range of difficulties. They have to reach the new site, establish there, survive the local abiotic conditions, cope with their new neighbours, and reproduce locally. Ecologists from various disciplines (dispersal, invasion, population and restoration ecology) try to identify the factors that determine establishment and species invasions. In this session we want to bring together their newest findings.
Highlight:
"Current methodological breakthroughs (e.g. in next generation sequencing and the “omics”) allow microbial ecologists to achieve major leaps in environments such as rhizosperes, lakes, sediments but also guts. Systems biology has a different research agenda but employs the same tools. This session present some exciting state-of-the-art examples that employ novel methodology to address questions raised in microbial ecology and systems biology, aiming at a better understanding of microbial organisms and the ecosystem they function in."

Conveners:
1. David Thieltges (Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research)
(David.Thieltges@nioz.nl)
2. Jan Dent (Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research)
(Jan.Drent@nioz.nl)
Conveners:
1. Fred de Boer (Wageningen University)
(Fred.deboer@wur.nl)
2. Nienke Hartemink (Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve)/Utrecht University) (N.A.Hartemink@uu.nl)
Conveners:
1. Kim Meijer (University of Groningen)
(k.meijer.bio@gmail.com)
2. Judith Sarneel (Netherlands Institute of Ecology)
(j.sarneel@nioo.knaw.nl)
Conveners:
1. Liesje Mommer (Wageningen University)
(liesje.mommer@wur.nl)
2. Wolf Mooij (Netherlands Institute of Ecology)
(w.mooij@nioo.knaw.nl)
15:00




15:20




15:40




16:00
Break
16:10




16:30




16:50





Europe Hall
17:20
Closing Session (Hans de Kroon)
· Awards ceremony
o Best PhD research paper Award (Member of the Evaluation Committee)
o Best Poster Award (Roland Bobbink, Chair NECOV)
· Synthesis (Louise Vet)

Lounge
18:00
Fare-well drinks and Dinner
19:30
Travel Home (Shuttle available between Conference Centre and Station)

7 Feb - 8 Feb 2012

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Netherlands
meeting website